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Line's Relaxed Copenhagen Home with Pretty Pastels

Hej vänner! Popping in with a little Danish inspiration for you to today. Think pared back, whitewashed, with pops of pastel. Yay! This beautiful apartment belongs to Line Schjelde, a Copenhagen based PR manager, who lived with her boyfriend and their little daughter. Excitingly, the family are expecting a little baby girl in a matter of weeks! Given the serenity of the space, it's hard to imagine their home is in the heart of the thriving, urban district of Vesterbro (fabulous area to explore if you're ever in town!). It's beautifully calm yet has some wonderful focal points thanks to the gallery wall, beautiful furniture choices and the lovely details!  Enjoy the tour! 

No one does gallery walls like the Danes! 

Prints from: Paper Collective, Hein Studio, Matisse (available here) and Modernamuseet

But my eyes are on the two mini ball pendant lamps - how cool are they? From what I can gather, Line made these herself using two rice paper balls (costing €5 each!). The HAY dining table is also fab - and the mix and match chairs help to create a relaxed look and feel.


One of the things I have been taken for granted lately are windowsills. Scandinavian homes are generally blessed with wide ones that can be used for so many things (this has been pointed out in the comment section a few times!). Walk around a city street or a country village and windows will be lit by a lamp (this one is the Balustre in pale pink* by Kähler) in the window - make your return home in the dark that more welcoming!

Another observation, un-related, but still interesting: front doors open outwards rather than inwards. I think this might have something to do with the snow - although that doesn't account for apartment doors. Hmmm. What are the windowsills like in your country, and do your front doors open inwards or outwards? 

The kitchen has been kept very minimalist aside from open shelves brimming with pottery by AnnLouise Roman Gustavsson,Julie Damhus Studio, Les Gens Heureux and Bitz Living

I love the sofa (from The Sofa Company - the colour is so warm and inviting - just imagine Line and her boyfriend snuggled up here with her two little girls! 


I get asked so many questions about floating bookshelves. Montana is a great source!

What a difference a pretty cushion can make to a room! Line picked this one up from Thus The Fuss (who's home I once featured here). Keep an eye out for her pop-up shops here

This lovely Ferm Living pond mirror* is really popular right now - I love the shape! 

The famous IKEA Stockholm cabinet that's now been discontinued and making waves on eBay! If you see one and you like it, nab it! 

What was I saying about windowsills? I mean, seriously!  

All in all, such a lovely home, it's really brightened up my Tuesday - I hope it has yours too!

Loving the pops of pastel!

I'll be keeping an eye on Line's inspiring feed for her latest updates - but more importantly for BABY NEWS! I'll never forget the birth of my second daughter and her sister rushing through the doors of the hospital shouting "WHERE'S MY SISTER?" before showering Allie with a million kisses! Wishing you so much luck with the birth Line - what a magical time you have ahead! 

Looking for a little more Danish inspiration today? 


Niki

Tonight, I'm excited to participate in a Live Shopping Event over at Boozt.com where I'll be sharing some fun ideas for how you can update your spring table for spring. Come and join us at 7pm (GMT+1). Admittedly, I'm a tad nervous right now (anything 'live' is a little daunting, don't you think?) so it would be wonderful to see a friendly face in the Q & A. Plus, you'll be able to enjoy a discount on anything you buy. Winner!  

Photography: Line Schjelde shared with kind permission. 
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Before & After: A Derelict Classroom Becomes An Incredible Kitchen!

Hello friends! Boy, have I got something inspiring to share with you today! I admire many people in the design world. But there are two people in particular, I am constantly in awe of: Laura Muthesius and Nora Eisermann of Our Food Stories. Everything this lovely couple touch turns to gold - from a Berlin warehouse and German countryside apartment to a beautiful cottage kitchen in Sweden. And now, they've turned their hands to a former schoolhouse in rural Germany. When they got the keys to the property a few months ago, it had been empty for decades and the interior was, shall we say 'rustic' to say the least! So much so, many would have run a mile, myself included. But fortune favours the brave and these two had a vision - which, with a lot of hard work, would become a dream reality! 

The exterior and interior was in dire need of some TLC, with many of the original features stripped away - including the windows, which had been replaced with cheap reproductions. 

Working as a food stylist and photographer (with over one million followers on instagram, no less!), Laura and Nora were keen to create a large kitchen from which to work, film and live. The pair set about tearing out a small bathroom to recreate the original classroom area. 

They were hoping to find a wood floor lurking beneath the layer of concrete but sadly, when they peeled it back, it had been destroyed so they laid a new oak wood parquet floor. They also swapped out the modern windows and replaced them with replicates of the original windows from Sorpetaler Fensterbau.

Fortunately, they were able to bring their Devol kitchen from their previous country apartment, which they supplemented with extra units to capitalise on space. 


One of the features I love the most is the vintage arched door, which Nora sourced online - WHAT A FIND!!!!


The kitchen units and worktops were planned around the natural light which pours in through the large windows. 

They installed a Bertazzoni cooker (which will no doubt play a major part in their delicous cake creation moving forward!). 

An incredible DeVol marble sink matches the countertop which was custom-made by MCR

Matt limewash paint from Bauwer Color was applied to the walls (Ibiza) and ceiling (Smokebush).  

And finally, the pair installed a mantel piece and a DeVol freestanding pantry cupboard on the opposite side of the kitchen. 

I love glass cabinets - they're a perfect way to display pretty kitchen items while keeping them dust free (a big problem with the open shelves under my kitchen island!). 

All-in-all one, a really incredible kitchen, don't you think? Trust this pair to create such a unique and original, timeless kitchen!

You can keep to date with their latest recipes on @_foodstories and interior projects over at @_designtales_. They've also shared more info about this kitchen reno here - and if you're curious, you can take a peek at their cosy Swedish cottage kitchen here

And if you're looking for more kitchen inspiration today - check out: 


Have a wonderful start to the week friends! 

Niki

Photography: Nora Eisermann & Laura Muthesius / Our Food Stories - shared with kind permission. 

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Peek Inside A Dreamy Turn-Of-The-Century Swedish Villa

In my mind there's no better way to finish off the week, than with a beautiful country home tour. And this one in Västra Götaland County, Sweden is positively dreamy. Maria Sundberg Holm has taken a personal approach to renovating her early 20th century house - and thinks nothing of constructing wall panelling, painting radiators and adding DIY touches by hand. Look closely and you'll also spot wonderful traditional touches - including ceramic doorknobs, vintage cabinets and William Morris wallpaper. Enjoy the tour! 



There are so many pieces to love in Maria's sitting room including: Petito sofa in sand from Furnova, lamp from Hallbergs of Sweden and Copenhagen rug.

'The Attentive One' character sculpture* by Kähler Design catches the light in the window - isn't it beautiful? 

Got any leftover wallpaper from a recent project? Why not repurpose it as art like Maria has done with her William Morris paper! 

A simple curtain in the landing helps to hide unsightly storage (source similar linen curtains online here). 

A bed layered with linen (if you're quick, you can still make the most of the 20% discount at Lovely Linen - the Swedish brand I used on Liv's bed and which she's been enjoying ever since) - they do the softest linen in really pretty muted shades. Use the code 'myscandinavianhome' at checkout to claim your discount (expires 21st March). 

Aaaaa, what a lovely home! So may lovely details - and such a serene feel.

I hope you felt inspired too! 

See more pictures and follow Maria's latest DIY projects over at @tradgardsgatan6. 

It's my lifelong dream to live in a turn of the century house like this. There are a few villas like this in Malmö but they're a little out of reach right now. But a girl has got to dream, right? That or a little cottage by the sea. 

What does your dream home look like? 

You might also like to pull up a chair, stay a while and enjoy these Scandinavian country homes:


Right, vänner! That's it from me this week! 

I hope you have a wonderful weekend - vi ses på måndag!

Niki

Photography: Maria Sundberg Holm, shared with kind permission. 
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Our kitchen - And the Perfect Danish Counter Stool!

MSH partnership*
Do you have a kitchen island? We added one when we first moved in over ten years ago. Little did we know it would become the hub of the home. It's used as a breakfast bar, a place to catch up after school / work, and a relaxed gathering place for friends (although there hasn't been so much of the latter lately, unfortunately!).  One of the trickiest things about a kitchen island though, is getting the stools right. What height? Should they have a back? Well friends, after a lengthy search, the B's might just have found 'the one' - thanks to Danish brand Skovby

Say 'hej' (pronounced 'hi') to the Skovby Counter Stool #808

Nerd alert: I'm about to share a little info about the height - which is helpful if you're sourcing a counter / bar stool but maybe not if you've just come here to enjoy a little inspiration today!

The height
It turns out, I wasn't looking for a bar stool (my initial search words!) - but a 'Counter Stool' - which tend to be 12 cm - 15 cm (5 to 6 inches) lower (although Skovby does do a nice Bar Stool too). It's also important to feel comfy - which means you want a clearance of around 22 cm - 30 cm (9 to 12 inches) between the seat and underside of the countertop. The seat on this stool is 65 cm high - allowing for just over a 22 cm gap, I'd see that is the absolute minimum requirement, but it totally works for our family. 

Comfort and design
Having lived in Scandinavia for more than 17 years (where did the time go?) - I'd never compromise on form over function. I'm also keenly aware that people tend to linger on stools longer than you think (just ask my younger daughter Allie!). With this in mind, I do love a backrest! The shell seat and back on this counter stool is crafted from the same piece of white oil oak veneer. And although it looks beautifully slim, it's also incredibly strong (it's internationally certified for use in cafes, restaurants, office buildings etc). The chrome footrest is also super practical. Trust the Danes to get it just right! 

Sidenote: in a couple of these pictures, I've shown a counter stool at the end of the island - in practise we never actually place one there as the island is only designed for two stools on the longer side. I was just exercising a little artistic license so you could see the stool from the back! 

Allie's favourite spot - she sits here for breakfast, a cup of tea (she is half English after all!) - and to chat to us about her day and what she's done at her gymnastics! 


I hope you enjoyed these snapshots from our kitchen - and the Skovby Counter Stool #808

I feel so honoured to call Skovby a long-term partner - in case you're curious about other beautifully crafted items I've put to the test, check out the following: 


Here's to Danish craftsmanship and beautiful design! 

In case you're interested in one or more of these fine specimens for your own home, you can find your nearest Skovby retailer here

Curious about other items seen in these pics of my kitchen? Give me a shout below and I'd be happy to help!

Wishing you a lovely day friends! 

Niki

*This post is brought to you in paid partnership with Skovby. However, all words are my own and I only ever work with brands I love and think you will too! Thank you for supporting the wonderful businesses that make My Scandinavian Home possible. 

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Our Tiny Swedish Holiday Cabin: Exterior Inspiration


Those of you who have been following My Scandinavian Home for a while (thank you!), will know that Per's family have a little summer cottage on the coast of North West Skåne. It was built by Per's grandparents in the 1930s and today, it's enjoyed by Per's Mother - who heads there for much of the summer. We also love to stay there whenever possible - at the weekends, over Easter and for several weeks in the summer. It's our very own little paradise, understated, raw, rugged and windswept. Days are spent sipping coffee, wondering through the pine forest or village in our dressing gowns to the water's edge, playing games while the rain comes down or chugging out to the island of Hallands Väderö (second picture down) by boat. Here are a few shots I've snapped with my phone over the years. I hope it'll give you an idea of the surrounding nature, and the simple life we lead at the cottage!




Tiny Cabin Location and Inspiration 



Per's Grandfather fell in love with the area just like we have many years later and built the little cottage (above) up on a hill near the church. Per's Mother, an avid reader of my blog (hej hej!), recalls playing in the meadows in front of the cottage as a child, and taking a 'morgondopp' (morning dip) in the sea. These days, the 'meadows' are occupied by summer houses, but Liv and Allie still love to run carefree down to the water for a swim, no matter the weather. 

The cottage itself is tiny, and if we're all in place - the sofa becomes a sofa bed and the children and their friends sleep on a bunkbed and a blow-up mattress. It works for now, but we'd love to spend more time there - and as the children grow-up, we'd love for their children to enjoy it as we do today! 

In Sweden, it's common to build tiny cabins in the grounds of a summer cottage to make space. Known as an 'Attefallshus', you are permitted to build a 25 square metre (269 square feet) cabin and, recently, also a 30m2 cabin (322 square feet) - known as a 'Komplimentbostadshus' (try pronouncing that!) in the grounds of your property (see restrictions here - in Swedish). It's the latter we're interested in since it will give us enough space for a family of four. This winter, we marked out a section of the lawn and the planning has finally begun! So exciting! 


We have earmarked this section of the garden beside an old oak tree running parallel along the fence to the neighbours' garden (with their kind permission) - which affords both properties some privacy.  

Cabin Exterior Inspiration

When Per and I brainstormed the look and feel of the cabin we decided against replicating the main house and instead were keen for the exterior to blend into the surroundings - and incorporate the rugged nature of the forest and coastline. Wood therefore felt like an obvious material for the exterior - and we love that it ages gracefully over time. The exact wood and tone is to be determined (watch this space) but we particularly love the look and feel of the cladding above and below. 

Since life at the cabin is about spending time outdoors and soaking up the surroundings, we're keen for the cabin to have large windows which draw the outdoors in and allow a seamlessness between the garden and the interior. Lately I've been partial to grid windows, seen below. 

This is obviously WAY bigger than 30m2, but more to demonstrate the windows I was talking about! 

Off-plan or Our Own Design? 

There are a fair few 'off-plan' cabin solutions available in Sweden, some of which create the entire cabin in their yard before dropping into place with a truck and crane. This sounds like a brilliant hassle-free option on paper, but  in practise, we have a really clear picture of what we were looking for - and none of them quite fit the bill. So began the search for an architect. More of which I'll share with you in my next 'Tiny Cabin' update along with the plans. 

In the meantime, I'd love to hear your thoughts. Do you like the wood exterior? Are you also a fan of these types of windows? Perhaps you have some experience of building a tiny cabin or house yourself and like to share some insight (as rookies, we'd be eternally grateful!). 

Here is a little more great 'tiny cabin' inspiration:


Oh, and the last cabin is actually a holiday home on the Isle of Skye - available to rent! I know! Scotland anyone?   

Wishing you all a lovely 'lillördag'! 

Niki

Photography credits: 1 - 9 Niki Brantmark / My Scandinavian home, 10. Krista Keltanen for the book Happy Homes, 11. Barn House Cabin 12. Light and Dwell 13. Wild croft on the Isle of Skye

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