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A Contemporary Swedish Ski Chalet With a Wonderful Window Seat!

Hej friends, I hope you had a lovely weekend! Do you ever find that you really look forward to December and all the festive things you'll do and then it arrives and you feel completely overwhelmed? I was feeling like that on Friday so I planned a day of cross country skiing with a dear friend of mine. We headed out to the Skåne countryside and spent the day gliding (occasionally ungracefully!) through the glistening snow. And I came home feeling like a new person. It was with this in mind that I chose today's home tour: a magnificent contemporary ski chalet in Vemsdalen, Sweden. Read on to feel inspired, and feel a sense of  calm a world away from the Christmas chaos! 


The dreamy contemporary ski chalet is a stripped back version of the usual long cabin - with pitched ceilings and waxed birch plywood walls. The focus is on the surrounding a nature, and a window seat makes an inviting spot from which to watch skier whizz by! 

Darker colours help to add contrast and add a cosy touch. 


A ladder leads up to a loftbed. 


Imagine waking up here and watching the slow fall! I'd be tempted to stay there all day with a book, how about you? 


A warm sauna awaits after a day of alpine skiing, snowmobiling, cross country or dog sledding in the snowy surroundings. 



How heavenly. I'd quite happily spend my winter here, how about you? 

Dream about more Scandinavian inspired cabins and ski chalets today.


Would you like to see a couple of pictures from my cross country skiing in the South of Sweden yesterday? Here are a couple of snaps I took with my phone, it was a rare gems of a day!



Above you can see my friend Ullis, over the barbecue just behind the tracks!

Wishing you all a great start to the week! 

Niki

Ski chalet photos courtesy of 212 Property

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The Cosy, Warm and Inviting Home of A Norwegian Artist

After a sharing a string of Scandinavian Christmas inspiration, I decided to take a break from the decorations today in favour of a very cosy, very lovely Norwegian home. The home in question is located in a beautiful 17th century building in Bergen and belongs to artist Marie Storaas, wife Ingis - a graphic designer, and their children Mille and Emil. Laid out over three floors, the unique living space combines Norwegian design with a hint of Italian and French countryside, giving it a wonderful warm and homely vibe. Photographer Gunn Kristin Monsen was there to snap these pictures. 

How beautiful! I absolutely love this home - such perfect feel-good inspiration with which to complete the blog week!

Is there anything that stood out to you?

Discover Marie's portfolio and keep a look out for her latest pieces on instagram

And discover other beautiful Norwegian homes: 


Looking for some Scandinavian Christmas inspiration over the weekend? Check out the Christmas archive for tons of Scandi 'Jul' ideas! 

Wishing you all a great weekend, see you Monday! 

Niki

Photography: Gunn Kristin Monsen - shared with kind permission, recently featured in Rom123. 

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How To Make Swedish Christmas Angels From Paper

Swedish photographer Malin Mörner has been at it again - this time creating the most beautiful DIY paper Christmas angels.  You might recall her DIY baubles, paper chains and stars last year, and now Malin has shared the step-by-step instructions on how to create this Christmas decoration out of wallpaper.  Read on to discover how to make your own 'choir of angels'! 

What you need: 
- Paper
- Wooden beads
- White cotton thread
- Glue gun
- Double sided sticky tape
- Hole punch
- Sewing needle 

What to do: 

1. Cut the paper into sections according to the following measurements: 
To make small angels: wings 8 x 12 cm, skirt: 11.5 x 13 cm (width x height)
To make big angels: wings: 11.5 x 14 cm, skirt 14 x 16 cm (width x height)

2. Fold each section into a concertina shape - starting at the shorter end, with each fold around 1 cm in width. 

3. Shape the ends of the folds with scissors (creating rounded ends, points or hearts) or use the hole punch to create a pattern. 

4. Fold your concertina paper in half and make a hole through the middle, cutting through all the layers. 

5. Glue the wings (the smaller section) to the skirts (the larger section) 

6. Use the needle to guide the string the entire way through the holes in the skirt and wings and tie a knot at the bottom so that it stays in place. 

7. Thread the bead onto the string above the wings, pull it tight and then glue the bead to the wings. Knot the string at the top, leaving a fairly large loop with which to hang your angel. 

8. Unfold the skirt and glue the inner edges to one another to form a skirt. 

And that's it! You have your choir of angels! 

I hope you have a fun time making these! See more pictures and instructions over at Böråstapeter

Looking for other DIY Christmas decoration ideas? How about: 


Wishing you all a great start to December - it's snowing here which tells me it's going to be a cold one but a fun one! 

Niki

Photography Malin Mörner shared with kind permission

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A Cosy Swedish Cottage In The Snow

If we'd seen an alfresco winter table setting two years ago, we'd have thought the idea was crazy - but in today's world, it not only seems like a perfectly normal scene, but also at times the only way to gather with friends and family right now! So, friends, don your best snow boots, wrap up warm and pull up a sheep-skin lined seat - it's time to take you on a tour of a snowy Swedish cottage, and temperatures here are well below minus right now! 
Located around 45 minutes outside of Stockholm, the charming cottage consists of a main house and barn - both of which provide bunks for overnight guests and can also be used for cosy gatherings! 
In wintertime a table is set up outside, in the shelter of the barn. I have to say, the idea reminds me a little of Christmas at my Swedish Father-in-law's house. We often gather outside for glögg and pepperkaka before heading indoors to thaw out over a Julbord (Christmas buffet). 
A pathway has been carved out with a shovel and lit by large outdoor tea lights. Do you have these in your country? In Scandinavia they're often placed either side of a front door when you're entertaining and provide a warm welcome! 
The fire pit has also come into its own in the past 18 months (see '7 winter warmer essentials for outdoor gatherings). 
Meanwhile, indoors, the charming cottage is full of pretty details including beams, angled ceilings and fireplaces - making it a cosy place to while away winter weekends! 

Isn't it lovely?

I read yesterday that there's a group of people stuck in a pub in England for the third day running due to treacherous weather. My question is - would you rather be snowed in here or an English pub? I guess it depends a little on the supplies and who you are with, but I'd definitely vote for this cottage! 

Would you like to see other snowy Scandinavian homes today? 


Stay warm friends! 

Niki

Photography Melinda Rönnberg, styling Stories by Chaundy courtesy of Bosthlm

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A Beautiful Copenhagen Home Full of Festive Cheer!

Christmas is a time for visiting old friends. And I feel we're doing exactly that today. You might remember earlier this year I took you on a tour of Mette Helena Rasmussen's art-filled Danish home. The date was 13th January - which marks the final day for taking down Christmas decorations in Scandinavian calendar, - and her home was looking fresh and ready for the year ahead. Today, I thought it would be fun to revisit her home and see what it looks like all decorated for Christmas, after all, the Danes have such a wonderful sense of style! And boy, is it full of festival cheer! Think figurines perched on picture frames, little decorations hung on the wall, stars, candles, red berries, and a big tree festooned with pretty pieces. And best of all, many of the pieces were bought second-hand. Welcome to Mette Helena's home in Amager, Copenhagen which she shares with her two children. 

Paper stars are a popular choice in Scandinavia - and you can choose to leave them plain or add a lightbulb so they glow at night.

This brown paper star* is similar. 

Potted evergreens on the balcony help to add that touch of greenery we're missing at this time of year. Throw in a sheepskin*, blanket* and even some fairy lights and you'll create a a really 'hyggeligt' spot! 
Simple pinecones on each place setting add a warm earthy touch to the Christmas table, while mix and match chairs and a subtly creased white linen tablecloth* help to add a relaxed touch. 

Mini trees with one or two simple decorations help to add a festive touch to different areas of the home - or if you live small, are an ideal solution! Look closely at the side table and pictures frames and you'll see subtle touches everywhere. 

I can imagine finding 'forgotten' decorations until March - it usually happens in my home right after someone has clambered into the loft. Do you find this too? 
How pretty is this Christmas tree? I love that no two decorations are alike. 
Much of what this home so cosy at Christmas is the details. And this homemade garland above the door is exactly what I'm talking about. hearts, bells, candy cane and toadstools all play a part in the Scandinavian Christmas scene! 

In the children's bedroom a white jewellery holder has been used as a makeshift Christmas tree. I also spy homemade paper Christmas stars. My children used to make these at nursery school and we still hang them on our tree each year. 
Who says decorations need to be hung? Coloured baubles look equally pretty in a tray by the bed (or on plats or the windowsill as seen in this Swedish Christmas post). 

All in all, one truly inspiring Christmassy home. 

It makes we want to go all out on the detail this year, how about you? 

Is there anything that stood out to you? 

See more of Metta Helena's home and check out her shop Retro Villa

You might also like to check out these posts for plenty more Danish Christmas cheer!


Have a great start to the week, stay warm! 

Niki

Photography Tia Borgsmidt 

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