Scrolling

One Swedish Apartment, Two IKEA hacks!

Hejsan! One thing I've learned over the years, is never walk around a flea market (or IKEA for that matter) and see everything at face value. Instead, see it for its potential! Love the shape of a cabinet but not sure about the wood? Paint it. Love the legs of a table but dislike the top? Change it. There is SO much you can do! Just look at the bed in the home of Hanna Söderström. Hanna loved the shape of a second-hand bed frame but wasn't keen on the heavy, dark wood, so she painted it in a wonderful grey to blend in with the walls - and it gave the piece a whole new lease of life in the process! 

For a more simple approach, take the IVAR cabinet from IKEA. It's become one of the most hacked items in the collection, and you rarely see a Swedish home without it. In this lovely open-plan Gothenburg apartment, it pops up twice, can you see where? Enjoy the tour, there are plenty of other ideas to steal too! 

I love the layout of this open-plan living space - it has a zone for everything! Pay special attention to the lamps too, which include the Formakami pendant* and Panthella table lamp* - both fabulous! 

It's amazing what a single branch from the garden / surrounding area can do for a space - plus it's free!

Styling tip: it's hard to find really tall indoor plants without paying through the roof. Place larger plants on stools to give the illusion of height and keep it from marking the floor (at least, until you've lovingly nurtured it to grow to the ceiling!). This teak round stool* is similar.  

IKEA IVAR cabinet hack number one: the exterior has been painted in a fab salmon pink to add a touch of colour to the children's bedroom. The shade also helps to tie the bedroom in with the hallway. It's also been given new legs (available from companies such as Pretty Pegs). 

IVAR cabinet hack number two: in the hallway the same cabinet has been adapted with a ribbed front and new pine legs. If you're a bit of a dab hand, you can easily recreate this look with wood from your local DIY store. If not, try companies such as Superfront - who make cabinet doors, handles, knobs and legs for IKEA furniture. 

Sidenote: I updated an IVAR cabinet in Liv's room. Note that it was originally designed to be wall mounted and can be unsteady when you attach legs so make sure you fasten it to the wall to avoid injury to yourselves and objects! 

Styling tip: Sometimes hallways are just too narrow / small to add a load of furniture and can feel a bit bare if painted one shade. Wallpaper like this one, helps to add interest without cluttering up the space. 

Do you like to hack furniture? If so, please do share your tips / favourite hacks in the comment section and inspire us! 

I loved hearing the debate on wrinkled / non-wrinkled bedding in the comment section on Friday! What are your thoughts on this? 

I'm about to shoot off to photograph a beautiful autumn piece in my sitting room (keep an eye on instagram tomorrow to see what it is!) - but before I leave, here are a couple of other homes you might like: 


Vi ses imorgon! 

Niki

This home is for sale via Alvhem. Photography: Henrik Linden, Styling: Grey Deco Interiors

Twitter FaceBook

Pin It
2

Per's Best Tips On Laying Hardwood Flooring Yourself







A few weeks ago I mentioned we needed a new wood floor in our open-plan living, kitchen and dining room. Thank you so much to everyone who shared their thoughts on which floor to go for - we loved reading all your comments, they were so helpful! After much deliberation, we decided to go for the Cured Oak LYBY wide plank (28 cm), with a rustic, white matte lacquer finish from Swedish brand Bjelin. We felt the wide plank fitted well with our modern townhouse and loved the light tone with a subtle yet lively, natural rustic touch (being a naturally dark room we were keen to brighten it up as much as possible). The cured wood is also known for being incredibly strong and hard wearing - perfect with the crazies around! Here's a close-up:


Rather than get someone in to install the floor professionally, we (or perhaps I should say Per!) decided it would be more fun to do it ourselves. With the work well underway, I thought it could be interesting to ask Per a little more about the workings of a wood floor, how difficult they are to lay and whether he'd recommend it!

Have you ever laid a wood floor before?
Yes, which actually made me hesitate to do it again as it was pretty difficult to get it right (*laughs*)

Why's that?
I started at one end but left a small gap, which made it tricky to lay the next row and so on. A small error at the beginning meant it took me way longer than it should have done. But the end result was good, which gave me the confidence to give it another go! 

Why would you prefer to lay a wood floor yourself than get someone in professionally? 
I think it's a nice feeling to know you've done it yourself: there's a certain pride in it. Of course, you save money in the process too, which is also a bonus!



Could anyone lay a wood floor?
I would say that anyone could lay a wood floor like this one. This time it was much easier because Bjelin floors have a special locking system which means the planks click into place without the need to use glue or nails. The only time it can get a little fiddly is around places like the radiators - but there's always a solution!

Are there any useful sources if you get stuck? 
Our wood floor came with a step-by-step installation instruction sheet. I also find YouTube tutorials helpful - especially when dealing with trickier areas.

What tools do you need to lay a wood floor?
The only power tool I used was a jigsaw but it would also have been good to have used a circular saw to cut the planks to the right size. You should also wear an eye mask and preferably a work bench and clamp to cut the wood planks too!

Side note: as with any work environment, you should also wear good, protective clothing - such as proper shoes (something I will think about for next time!). Thank you for the 'unknown' for pointing this out in the comment section, very good point and very important! 



How do you prep a room before laying the floor?  
1. Remove the furniture from the room (since ours is quite a large area, we shifted the furniture over to one side and then shifted it back once we had finished the section)
2. Remove the skirting boards and mark the back of them with a pencil so you know exactly where they were (it can be tricky to remember otherwise which can be time consuming later on).
3. Remove old flooring
4. If you're lucky there'll be an underlay already in place, if not you'll need to lay one.
5. Give the surface a clean.

Do you have any advice for anyone laying a wood floor for the first time?
Choose a good quality floor, preferably with a locking system like Bjelin's and dare to throw yourself at the task. Planning things in advance like which side of the room to start and plotting any tricky areas will save time later. If in doubt, get advice from your dealer. Also, measure up to five times before you cut any wood- a stitch in time saves nine! 



Did you make any errors this time? 
Not really. A professional floor layer would probably have made a cleaner job around the radiators, but I found that a special filler matching the tone of the wood did wonders to cover up any imperfections!

How long did it take for you to lay the floor?
Around 3-4 days in total. And no doubt 3-4 years to finish the details (like repainting the skirting boards etc!).

Did you learn anything for next time?
Next time? Are you plotting something Niki?

Might be...!
After removing the skirting boards and old floor, I'd give the walls and ceilings a fresh lick of paint before I lay the new floor.

Any final words to anyone considering laying a wood floor? 
Laying a wood floor yourself may sound daunting, but if you have the time and energy, it's a surprisingly easy task and you'll feel really proud knowing you did yourself!

***

What do you reckon, do you recognise this from laying your own wood floor? If so, perhaps you have some more tips to share with us. If you're about to get a new wood floor and considering laying it yourself, I hope this has given you the confidence to dive in!

I can't wait to show you the final results next Sunday!

Niki

Twitter FaceBook

Pin It
5

5 DIY Projects to Try During Quarantine

I wish I could say that I'm an absolute whiz at power tools or a sewing machine, but to be honest, I am a reluctant DIYer. A lot of the DIY or craft projects I find look a little too homespun for my liking, or the effort required to make it look like the real deal is overwhelmingly tedious or calls for carpentry skills I just don't have. But this quarantine has me wanting to spruce up my home in a more resourceful, hands-on way, so I've rounded up five DIY projects for you that are simple, can be mostly done indoors (with the exception of sanding!) and actually look more high-end than you'd expect.

1. Plant Propagation Wall
This delightful wall of plant cuttings DIY is brought to you by Christine Higgs of @forthehome. It's the perfect project for those who've had extra time to mist, primp, sing to and propagate all your plant babies during this quarantine. 

Christine Higgs / @forthehome


2. Textured art
Here's another DIY from the very resourceful and productive Christine, who created some beautiful, dimensional pieces for her home with acrylic paint and modeling paste. She's got a video tutorial on her IGTV if you'd like to check it out! It's the perfect addition to a bare wall or corner that just needs the subtlest touch of texture that won't compete with its surroundings. 


Christine Higgs / @forthehome

Christine Higgs / @forthehome


3. Wireless Pleated Lamp
This is more of a hack than a DIY, but it's still very satisfying to the lazy DIYer! I've been wanting the right ceramic base for a pleated lampshade I found online and for now, settled on a ceramic vase I already owned. But since the lamp shops are closed, and I don't feel like drilling into the bottom of my vase (risky!) and wiring it myself, I was inspired by Lisa Danielle Smith to simply plunk the shade on top of the vase and call it good. But if you'd actually like a functional lamp rather than a decorative statement, there are also plenty of wireless bulb options, such as LED lights controlled by remote control that you can jimmy rig into the vase. Thanks, Janae for that last tip!


Lisa Danielle Smith




4. Trash to Terracotta
When Geneva Vanderzeil found a can of liquid terracotta at her local hardware store, she tried to find as many applications for it as possible. One of her projects was taking a motley bunch of thrift store vases and turning them into some of the lovely terracotta pieces you see here. While this specific liquid terracotta product isn't available everywhere, she's created a DIY chalk paint recipe to give you a similar, textured ceramic look. You can also check out the hashtag #trashtoterracotta on Instagram to see all the people who've been following her lead! 

Before



After
Geneva Vavanderzeil / DIY tutorial


This handy little tool can work wonders on old wooden furniture and decor items with a less than desirable stain (or paint job). If you're looking for a light, neutral, raw-looking finish, you might be surprised at the wood that could be lurking under a shiny, orange-hued layer of lacquer or a dark, mahogany stain. And if you do uncover a beautifully rustic and antiqued wood underneath but still want a protective top coat, I recommend using a water-based, matte polyurethane as it'll still look more raw plus the water-based poly's are less prone to yellowing than oil-based! Cynthia Harper is someone who is constantly making use of her orbital sander and going to town on anything from coffee tables to cheap, wooden bowls from her local thrift store that end up looking like chic, weathered, farmhouse bowls rather than .99 cent castaways. 


Cynthia Harper / Orbital Sander



It's been so fun to share these ideas with you. I hope you've discovered a DIY project you'd like to replicate in your own home! Are there any that stand out in particular?

It's a public holiday in Sweden today and Niki will be back on Sunday. She sends a 'stor kram' (big hug!).

Wishing you all a wonderful weekend!

Ezz

Ezz Wilson is an interior and photo stylist and holistic home consultant based in Portland Oregon. You can find her over on instagram here

First picture by Christina Higgs / @forthehome

Twitter FaceBook

Pin It
3

7 Beautifully Simple Easter DIY Craft Ideas From Scandinavia

Easter is a few days away (here in Scandinavia it's one day earlier since they celebrate on Påskafton (Easter Saturday). This year, we may not be able to enjoy large family gatherings, and some traditions may need to be put on hold for another year, but we sure can decorate our homes and bring a pretty touch that will put a smile on our faces! So, if you feel like a little Påskpyssla (Easter crafting), here are 7 of my favourite beautifully simple DIY ideas from Scandinavia, with love: 


1. Eggs with crowns: Boiled eggs with happy faces and pretty crowns like these ones by Norwegian Engla Monica Strand are sure to light up everyone's faces come Easter Day morning! 

2. Naturally dyed eggs: Get creative with the contents of your food cupboard and dye your eggs all kinds of natural colours for a pretty display like Swedish stylist and florist Malin Björkholm. Check out this guide on how to make natural dye

3. Hang paper eggs from branches: Follow this YouTube guide to make pretty 3D paper eggs and hang them from branches like Elin Wallin

 4. Wire feathers to branches: channel a popular Swedish tradition and wire colourful feathers to birch branches for a pretty display like Swedish set designer Marianne Wikner!


5. Make an Easter wreath: Decorate your door or brighten up a corner of your home with a beautiful Easter wreath like this pretty one by Kristin Østebø. This YouTube tutorial offers a great step by step guide. 


6. Get crafting with leftover wallpaper: It's amazing what you can create with leftover wallpaper. Malin Mörner shares a lovely DIY here (remember her Christmas wallpaper DIY?!) and Frida Andersson has created pretty birds for a flight of fancy display! The original DIY for these birds is in the book Hidden Places - but if you haven't got time to pick up a copy, I reckon you could wing it (see what I did there?!) by using a bird template for the body and the DIY from Christmas Snöblomma for the wings. 

7. Brighten up your home with paper daffodils! Take a leaf (sorry!) out of Helen Lyth's book and make these pretty paper daffodils. You can find a step by step guide here (it's in Swedish but there's always good old google translate!). 


I hope these ideas have given you some inspiration for your home this Easter. 

Are there any that caught your eye? 

You can find more Easter crafting ideas here: 


Wishing you a lovely day friends!

Niki

First picture by Anne Lemonfox and last picture by Malin Mörner

Twitter FaceBook

Pin It
4

Let it Glow: 5 Pretty Candle Displays You Can Make In An Instant!

The winter solstice 2019 will be at 05.19 this Sunday, 22nd December (counting down the seconds? You bet I am!). From then on, the days slowly get lighter - PHEW! Anyone else feeling a tiny bit relieved? In my mind, the only saving grace is that the darkness gives us an excuse to light candles, and lots of them, which makes for one very cosy home! On the dining table, in the window, by the sink. As long as there's nothing flammable nearby, there's no end to where you can add a little glow. Here are 5 of my favourite, simple DIY candle displays this winter! 

1. Swedish Advent ljusstake: two weeks ago, Per mentioned in this interview how much he loves the traditional Swedish 7-arm candelabra. I have to say, they do look very beautiful in the window (from the inside and out!). Sadly, they're not easy to find in all countries, but if you fancy something similar, why not make one yourself with different size vintage brass candleholders. So pretty! 

2. Jam jars and pine: everyone has a few jam jars lurking in a drawer - why not make use of them and create these simple tea light holders using garden twine and pine (if you don't feel like lopping them off your tree, ask for a few off cuts at your local Christmas tree market, I'm sure they'd be happy to help! 

3. Moss candleholders: no vintage brass candlesticks to hand? Fill glass jars with moss for an instant candleholder - twine and rosemary optional! Do keep an eye on them when lit though - especially if the moss is dry! 

4. Candles and pine in the window: you can't get more simple than white candles in jam jars and branches of pine laid across the windowsill - and it looks super cosy too! 

5. Simple DIY table wreath: A daily Something has shared this simple DIY candle wreath here. I love the idea of the delicate grey, tapered candles too - so elegant! Could this be something for your Christmas table?

Did anything catch your eye? I'm a big fan of moss and have already made a few candle holders with it at home (I also love to wrap moss around the bulb of hyacinths and amaryllis). 

A quick reminder to be really careful with candles - always blow them out when you leave the room and make sure your home is well ventilated! 

If you'd like a few more Christmas decorating ideas check out: 


There's also plenty of Scandinavian home tours all decked out for Christmas in the archive

Have a cosy day!

Niki

Credits: 1. Christina Strehlow 2. Linnea, Lovely Life 3. Source unknown - Pinterest (tips welcome!) 4. DIY Jewellery ideas (if this is not correct, please let me know!) 5. Pufik Homes 6. A Daily Something

Twitter FaceBook

Pin It
1

3 Beautiful Christmas Decorations You Can Make From Wallpaper!

If you've wallpapered your home in the last few years, the chances are, you'll have a few rolls left over - and its way too pretty to waste! Swedish photographer and stylist Malin Mörner (@poppyloveyou) and her daughter created these wonderful Christmas decorations using wallpaper from Boråstapeter. Think bunting, paper chains, and beautiful baubles that can be hung in the window or the branches of your Christmas tree! No wallpaper at home? Pick up some from Boråstapeter, vintage rolls*, or use heavyweight patterned paper instead! 

Bunting and paper chains


To make the bunting, gather wallpaper (Malin has used in Bloom 7203, Northern Stripes 6852, Graceful Stories 7274 and Northern stripes 6854 from Boråstapeter) scissors, string, paper, glue and clothes pegs - and then follow the step by step instructions here (in English!). 

For the paper chains you'll need wallpaper (as above), scissors, a stapler or sticky tape. The instructions can be found here

Paper baubles:


The kit required to make these baubles includes: wallpaper (these ones have been made using Thistle 7203, Harvest Stripe 6854, Rosenvinge 4501 and Dusk Green 7981 from Boråstapeter), wire, a hole punch, wire cutters, round-nose pliers, wooden beads, jute twine and scissors. Once gathered, hop over here to follow the step by step instructions (in English!).  



Aren't these pretty?!

I actually have a few rolls of wallpaper knocking about at home and might give these a whirl! Could be fun to do with the girls! 

Could you imagine making these?

See more pretty Christmas inspiration from Malin Mörner over on her instagram here - and check out the complete Boråstapeter wallpaper collection here

FYI this is not sponsored in anyway, I just loved the idea and thought you might feel inspired by it too! 

If you're in the mood for crafting, there are a load more Christmas decoration ideas here

Niki

Photography Malin Mörner for Boråstapeter

Twitter FaceBook

Pin It
5

skovby ad


 

site by Ana Degenaar

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website.
MORE INFO