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Charming Details In a Danish Allotment Cottage


'God morgen' as they say in Danish! How was your weekend? I read that today is referred to as 'blue Monday' - considered by some the saddest day of the year. Apparently, it's down to a number of factors including bad weather (check), long nights (check) and of course this year, a certain word beginning with C! Well, not on my watch friends, because we're going to be wrapped in a warm bubble of 'glæde' as we tour a charming kolonihavehus (allotment cottage) in the Danish countryside! It may be pared-back - but it's also full of warmth thanks to the carefully selected vintage furniture - as well as the small, joyful details which give this little space, a big heart! Welcome to Danish knitwear designer and interior stylist Gaia Brandt's world!


Are you familiar with the 'kolinihave' concept? These little Scandinavian cottages are built on allotments - and were originally designed to provide shelter in between toiling the soil. These days, they have become a picturesque summer holiday retreat for many city dwellers. I've shared more details about this type of Scandinavian housing here

Usually, there are tight restrictions on how many days a year you can stay - and the water is turned off between Autumn and springtime. But come summertime, these little cottage communities come alive and provide a perfect summer oasis! 


As with most Scandinavian summer cottages, the look here is simple, with a focus on bringing the outdoors in. 

Look closely though, and you'll spot lots of wonderful details - a unique pot here, a wall-mounted dolls house there, and lots of mobiles, which draw the eye upwards. 


A simple Danish rag rug helps to protect the wood floor in the kitchen. 


Playing with over-sized items helps to bring the living room area alive! 

Could that be a TV behind the sheet? 

An otherwise disused corner of the room has been transformed into a display area for a vintage collection of hearts, dried flowers and other ornaments. 



On warm summers day, the doors are thrown open so Gaia and her children can flit between the outdoors and inside. 


I bet many a strong coffee has been enjoyed right here!  


So lovely, don't you think? 

I can practically feel the warmth on my skin from the pictures (taken by Gaia's sister Kira Brandt - a talented photographer - for Danish magazine Boligliv

I'm also finding this tour so inspiring for the tiny cabin Per and I are planning to build this year (more to follow very soon!). 

Did you get any ideas for your own home? 

I forgot to mention that Gaia is a real dab hand at DIY / crafts. Check out her styling work for magazines here and see pictures of her latest home over on her instagram feed

And - for more inspiration to brighten up the start of your week, you might like to check out: 


Blue Monday? What blue Monday! 

Niki

Photography: Kira Brandt / styling Gaia Brandt for Boligliv - shared withy kind permission. 

LATEST COMMENTS:

  1. oh gosh I love that mushroom painting/photograph! Do you have any info on it?

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    1. Gaia just wrote to tell me that's by Danish artist Ebbe Stub Wittrup :)

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  2. I could move straight in. Truly lovely.

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    1. It's so wonderful isn't it? Simple, yet so serene and full of charm!

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  3. This is exactly what I needed today, as I watch the city workers clean and water the skating rink across the street. We are so far away from the summer where I live that sometimes it's so hard to get excited about it, especially on Blue Monday. But this little cottage has done it.

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    1. I'm so happy this tour has the desired affect on you this 'Blue Monday'! - roll on warm summer days!

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  5. So inspirational and just what the soul needs. Thank you for this lovely tour!

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  6. Such a cheerful vibe in this small space-thanks for sharing. A question for you...where does the Danish tradition of hanging mobiles in their homes come from? (Maybe it is traditional in all of the Scandinavian countries??) I am of Danish ancestry and have always loved having mobiles hanging in the rooms in my home! Just curious, thanks!

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    1. I love this question - sorry it's taken so long to reply! Danes have been enjoying mobiles for years. Flensted produced one in 1955 which has become truly iconic and many others have been suitably popular over the years. I'm thinking I might have to do a post on them, what do you think?

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  7. Such a well edited space with just the right touch of warmth and character. The exterior is just lovely, too. I like the dark finish on the body of the house. I’m wondering whether the roof material is clay?

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    1. Do you mean the tiles? I'm not sure actually, they do look really smart!

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  8. Dear Niki, Thank you so much for your articles and pictures. You bring so much beauty in my instagram feed! I am slightly obsessed by the gorgeous lounge chair on the 6th picture, is there any chance you could help me identify where it comes from? Thanks again for this beautiful tour!

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    1. So sorry that I appear as Unknown! I am Corinne :)

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    2. Hi Corinne, it's The Rag Chair by Bernt Petersen :) - love it too!

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    3. Thanks for your kind answer ! I live in the Netherlands and I was surprised to see how easy they are to find. I am now the happy owner of an original structure, and waiting to have it reupholstered next month to it's original beauty. I couldn't be happier, and that's very much thanks to you ! :)

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    4. That is SO exciting! I'm so happy you found one! Yay! I'm sure you'll treasure it for years to come :)

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  9. Gorgeous! Could you please tell me what kind of plants are on the dining room table (1st photo)? Thank you!

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