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A Charming Little Allotment Cottage In Malmö, Sweden

Fancy finishing the week with something quintessentially Swedish? In my mind, you can't get more 'svensk' than a 'kolonistuga' - and this little one is charming in every way! The little allotment cottage dating back to 1923 has been beautifully renovated by Rebecka Franzén - a physiotherapist with a passion for remodelling and decorating. I chatted to her about her little kolonistuga here in Malmö, the history behind these little cottages and why she's decided to put hers on the market

What is the story behind the 'kolonistuga'?
Allotment cottages have existed in Sweden for over a century. They were originally built for factory workers who moved from the countryside to the city as part of urbanisation. The idea was to give people an opportunity to grow their own vegetables and staples such as potatoes, carrots and fruit so they had some connection to their roots and could extend their household budget. 

Who owns these cottages today?
In recent years they have become increasingly popular with green-fingered people looking for a second home near to the city centre. 

How does a kolonistuga differ from other types of Swedish summer cottages?
The kolonistuga are usually quite small and not eligible for year-round living. Water is typically turned off between October and April. 

I am guessing they have been a welcome respite this summer? 
Oh yes, during the pandemic, they've been a real breath of fresh air for the owners, who can come here and feel connected with others while still maintaining social distance. 

Do these allotment areas have a close-knit community? 
Definitely. It's a place where people of all ages come together. There often organised events such as plant exchanging days, gardening activities and even boule tournaments and karaoke nights! Midsummer is also magical. 

Why have you decided to sell your cottage?
I recently quit my day job and bought an apartment in Lisbon that I am planning to renovate. This is why, with a heavy heart, I decided to sell my cottage. I really hope to find a new owner who loves this cottage as much as I have done. 

Well, I have to say, whoever snaps this up is one very lucky person!

Interested? Find out more information here

Curious to see a few other pretty allotment cottages? Here are some of my favourites: 


Could you imagine hanging out in one of these all summer? 

Or perhaps you have something similar I your own country? 

I know that in the UK you can build a shed but nothing that resembles a cottage. I remember spending copious amount of time at my Mum and Dad's allotment as a child - and will never forget treading on a slug barefoot. It still makes me shudder! My sister is on the waiting list for one in London, but it has a three-year waiting list! 

Right friends, I do believe it's time to wrap-up the week. I hope you felt inspired by all my posts this week! have a wonderful weekend! 

Niki

Photography courtesy of Bjurfors.

LATEST COMMENTS:

  1. Thanks, Niki. The stained glass windows are beautiful!

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  2. I have never wanted to live in Sweden more. I always have that thought on my mind (anywhere in Scandinavia would be a dream) but to be able to buy this place is something magical. You are right, anybody who does get it is very lucky.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Looks great, you really have an eye for detail and decadence, thanks for sharing

    ReplyDelete

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