How To Make Swedish Christmas Angels From Paper

Swedish photographer Malin Mörner has been at it again - this time creating the most beautiful DIY paper Christmas angels.  You might recall her DIY baubles, paper chains and stars last year, and now Malin has shared the step-by-step instructions on how to create this Christmas decoration out of wallpaper.  Read on to discover how to make your own 'choir of angels'! 

What you need: 
- Paper
- Wooden beads
- White cotton thread
- Glue gun
- Double sided sticky tape
- Hole punch
- Sewing needle 

What to do: 

1. Cut the paper into sections according to the following measurements: 
To make small angels: wings 8 x 12 cm, skirt: 11.5 x 13 cm (width x height)
To make big angels: wings: 11.5 x 14 cm, skirt 14 x 16 cm (width x height)

2. Fold each section into a concertina shape - starting at the shorter end, with each fold around 1 cm in width. 

3. Shape the ends of the folds with scissors (creating rounded ends, points or hearts) or use the hole punch to create a pattern. 

4. Fold your concertina paper in half and make a hole through the middle, cutting through all the layers. 

5. Glue the wings (the smaller section) to the skirts (the larger section) 

6. Use the needle to guide the string the entire way through the holes in the skirt and wings and tie a knot at the bottom so that it stays in place. 

7. Thread the bead onto the string above the wings, pull it tight and then glue the bead to the wings. Knot the string at the top, leaving a fairly large loop with which to hang your angel. 

8. Unfold the skirt and glue the inner edges to one another to form a skirt. 

And that's it! You have your choir of angels! 

I hope you have a fun time making these! See more pictures and instructions over at Böråstapeter

Looking for other DIY Christmas decoration ideas? How about: 


Wishing you all a great start to December - it's snowing here which tells me it's going to be a cold one but a fun one! 

Niki

Photography Malin Mörner shared with kind permission

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A Beautiful Copenhagen Home Full of Festive Cheer!

Christmas is a time for visiting old friends. And I feel we're doing exactly that today. You might remember earlier this year I took you on a tour of Mette Helena Rasmussen's art-filled Danish home. The date was 13th January - which marks the final day for taking down Christmas decorations in Scandinavian calendar, - and her home was looking fresh and ready for the year ahead. Today, I thought it would be fun to revisit her home and see what it looks like all decorated for Christmas, after all, the Danes have such a wonderful sense of style! And boy, is it full of festival cheer! Think figurines perched on picture frames, little decorations hung on the wall, stars, candles, red berries, and a big tree festooned with pretty pieces. And best of all, many of the pieces were bought second-hand. Welcome to Mette Helena's home in Amager, Copenhagen which she shares with her two children. 

Paper stars are a popular choice in Scandinavia - and you can choose to leave them plain or add a lightbulb so they glow at night.

This brown paper star* is similar. 

Potted evergreens on the balcony help to add that touch of greenery we're missing at this time of year. Throw in a sheepskin*, blanket* and even some fairy lights and you'll create a a really 'hyggeligt' spot! 
Simple pinecones on each place setting add a warm earthy touch to the Christmas table, while mix and match chairs and a subtly creased white linen tablecloth* help to add a relaxed touch. 

Mini trees with one or two simple decorations help to add a festive touch to different areas of the home - or if you live small, are an ideal solution! Look closely at the side table and pictures frames and you'll see subtle touches everywhere. 

I can imagine finding 'forgotten' decorations until March - it usually happens in my home right after someone has clambered into the loft. Do you find this too? 
How pretty is this Christmas tree? I love that no two decorations are alike. 
Much of what this home so cosy at Christmas is the details. And this homemade garland above the door is exactly what I'm talking about. hearts, bells, candy cane and toadstools all play a part in the Scandinavian Christmas scene! 

In the children's bedroom a white jewellery holder has been used as a makeshift Christmas tree. I also spy homemade paper Christmas stars. My children used to make these at nursery school and we still hang them on our tree each year. 
Who says decorations need to be hung? Coloured baubles look equally pretty in a tray by the bed (or on plats or the windowsill as seen in this Swedish Christmas post). 

All in all, one truly inspiring Christmassy home. 

It makes we want to go all out on the detail this year, how about you? 

Is there anything that stood out to you? 

See more of Metta Helena's home and check out her shop Retro Villa

You might also like to check out these posts for plenty more Danish Christmas cheer!


Have a great start to the week, stay warm! 

Niki

Photography Tia Borgsmidt 

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6 Beautiful, Simple Swedish Christmas Decorating Ideas from Anna's Home


It's no secret that I love Christmas, it's one of my favourite times of the year. I'm extra excited this week as this Sunday marks the First Day of Advent when I finally feel free to put up some decorations (hence the back-to-back 'jul' themed posts)! However, I understand that it's not everyone's cup of tea - or indeed that everyone celebrates Christmas so I promise to try to keep it balanced over the coming weeks!  

With that said, who's ready for some decorating ideas? Ho ho ho! One of my favourite Swedes to follow at time of the year is Anna Truelsen, her home is always full of beautiful, yet simple decoration ideas - many of which are handmade. Here are five I spotted which would make great crafting ideas: 


1. Homemade pine garland: I love a simple garland made from pine sprigs - they look equally pretty hung in the window as they do draped over the back of a chair (see top picture!). Find out how to make your own here
2. A simple sapling placed in a vase or pot of water: a very popular Scandinavian tradition (especially if you're lucky enough to have Christmas trees growing in your garden - yes, I know....!). Pulling saplings up and placing them in a vase, ceramic pot or other vessel of your choice make for a really pretty 'au natural' decoration. Plus you can replant them after the festive period! 

By the way, how stunning is Anna's table? Almost made me weep! 
3. Dried orange garlands: an annual staple and super easy to make, orange garlands add a lovely touch of colour and fill the home with a wonderful Christmassy scent! 
4. Paper snow flowers: these fine specimens have exploded in popularity in Sweden over the past few years, and they're so simple and fun to make.  There's a step by step guide here (in Swedish - but non-swedes should be fine as there are plenty of pictures!). 

5. Paper chains: got some leftover wallpaper or wrapping paper? Why not make some good old fashioned paper chains? See the know-how here along with DIY bunting and baubles! 

6. A Tree in a basket or pot: It's lovely to bring a tree into the house early, but if you're not careful it'll quickly droop come Christmas Day. And that's where potted trees come into the mix. If watered regularly, they'll stay fresh and healthy - as well as smell divine. And you can replant it once Christmas is over! 

I hope this has given you a few ideas! Hop on over to Anna's instagram to feel inspired! 

Looking for some pretty advent candle inspiration? I love these 5 pretty candle displays you can make in an instant.  

You might also like to take a peek inside the Christmas archive for more ideas. 

Also, do you make an advent calendar for your children / nieces and nephews / grandchildren / pets? One year I made this one for my girls. They loved it. I couldn't resist putting a couple of potatoes in one of the numbers as a joke. I was roaring with laughter. I did have a couple of sweets set to one side though, I'm not that mean! 

Have a hyggelig weekend friends!  

Niki

Photography: Anna Truelsen - shared with kind permission. 

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A Charming Festive Swedish Cottage In Winter Time

When do you start decorating your home for Christmas (if you do)? In Sweden the First Sunday of Advent is traditionally the day many Scandinavians start to add festive touches, although the darkness has prompted many to start early. I therefore felt it was time for my second 'Jul' post of the year and this charming Swedish cottage fits the bill perfectly! The traditional red and white property dates back to 1901 and was formerly the home of a platelayer (also known as a 'trackman' - whose job was to inspect and maintain the nearby railway line). Today, the charming cottage in Västmanland county belongs to Helena Dahl and her family. As you can tell from the furniture and accessories, Helena is a huge fan of vintage and antiques, and even runs a small instagram store selling Swedish vintage pieces. But what really caught my attention was just how pretty her home is at Christmas time, especially with the snow falling silently outside. Ready to feel warm and fuzzy inside? 

Simple boxwood wreaths hang from the door with red ribbon and a pine tree rests against the wall. 
In Sweden windows come alive at Christmas with paper star lanterns* and 'adventsljustake' (advent candlestick holders in an inverted V). 
The imperfections are what makes this little cottage so perfect! I particularly love the wonky walls and doorways which show the age of the cottage.
A tree sapling has been placed in a vase adding a subtle festive touch beside a sweet smelling hyacinth and simple candle. 
The Christmas tree has been festooned with vintage baubles, flags and other decorations, and lights up a dark corner under the stairs. 
A collection of three antique Swedish brass candleholders makes a pretty display on the coffee table. 
Spot the heart-shape snow-flake? But of course! 

Such a pretty home, don't you think? Is there anything that stood out to you? 

The cottage reminds me a lot of Helen's cosy Blekinge home - which I featured last week. When I see pretty country homes like these it makes me wonder if I should leave the city. Do you ever feel like that too? 

For those of you looking for new Scandi-style festive ideas for your home in the coming days, take a peek at: 

The hit DIY decoration of 2020 - a decoration made from cardboard loo rolls! 

Meanwhile, if you're American and heading off to enjoy the holidays - Happy Thanksgiving!! 

I'll be back tomorrow with a final post for the week, which will hopefully fill you with ideas for the weekend! 

Have a cosy day friends! 

Niki

Photography courtesy of Helena Dahl with thanks. 

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Beautiful Danish Christmas Decorations in a Cosy Swedish Cottage

 
These images were taken as part of a paid Christmas campaign for Pernille Bülow*

As I walked home early evening yesterday, the night sky was bathed in a warm light from the glow of fairy lights and candles shining brightly from windows and I felt a sense that Jul (Christmas) is just around the corner. In Blekinge, Sweden, interior designer Helen Sturesson's decorations will be slightly different this year thanks to a stunning handmade Christmas collection by Pernille Bülow - a glass atelier on the Danish island of Bornholm. It's safe to say the Pernille Bülow elves have been burning the midnight oil to create the most beautiful mouth blown baubles you'll find this year (some of which are made from recycled glass) - as well as candleholders, oil lamps, vases and dinnerware. I chatted to Helen to find about her family Christmas traditions up at the cottage, and to take some photos of the collection. 

When does the Christmas period begin for you? 
It starts on the first Sunday of advent when I put up star lanterns and line the windowsills with candles and oil lamps. Around St Lucia (13th December), we put up a Christmas tree and dot more Christmas decorations around the house. 

How do you like to decorate your home for Christmas? 
As well as the star lanterns and candles, I also love to find a little Christmas tree in the garden which I bring indoors and decorate with a few pretty baubles. And I make a wreath or two, also using whatever is available outside. Since it's so small, our cottage doesn't need more than that to feel festive and cosy.



Your cottage makes the perfect backdrop for Pernille Bülow Christmas decorations - what are your thoughts on the collection? 
I love that the ReUse items (bowls, glasses and decorations) are made from recycled glass and also that everything in the entire collection is handmade or mouth blown on the Danish island of Bornholm. Every piece feels really unique and good quality. You get so much more value from items that come directly from a designer / atelier and are not mass produced.  


When do you head to your cottage for the holidays?
We usually go there one or two days before Christmas. 


What do you love most about being at the cottage at Christmas time?
It's more cosy here than at our apartment in the city. I love to light the fire in the Kakelugn (tiled oven). It's very peaceful here and I really like to be near my parents and brothers who live nearby. 

Where do you spend Christmas Eve and what does your day look like (the day Christmas is celebrated in Sweden)?
On Christmas Eve we drive over to my parents which is around 15 minutes away. The entire family gathers so we're usually about 12 people in total. We all bring dishes for the 'Julbord' (the Christmas spread) and rally around in the kitchen to finalise the meal before it goes on the table. 

After lunch there's always someone who wants to sit down and watch 'Donald Duck and his friends wish you a Merry Christmas' - a bizarre Swedish Christmas tradition - while others chill and chat! In the evening Tomten (Father Christmas) arrives bearing gifts and we drink glögg (mulled wine). 



What type of dishes does your Julbord include? 
We have a fairly traditional one with ham, pickled herring, Jansson's Temptation (a potato dish with anchovies), meatballs, salmon etc washed down with 'Julmust' (a form of Christmas cola) a little beer and schnapps. In the evening we drink glögg (spiced mulled wine) with gingerbread and tuck into Rice á la Malta or Christmas porridge. 


What do you do on Christmas Day (the day after the festivities)? 
It's a very relaxed day. We meet up with my parents again and go for a long walk together in the countryside before eating leftovers from the Julbord. Sometimes we head back to the city to meet up with Kristoffer's family. 


When do you take down your decorations? 
I don't really stick to a specific date - it's basically when the tree starts to look awful! The stars are the last things I take down. It feels so dark without them. My son always gets sad and cries when we take the star down in his bedroom - he loves the cosy, warm light it emits. 


Thank you so much for sharing your Christmas with us Helen, it sounds so lovely!

And thank you to Pernille Bülow for entrusting Helen and I with all the beautiful glassware! 

Follow any of the links in this post to treat yourself or friends (everything they sell makes a perfect present, but especially the clear mouthblown baubles which come in a lovely box!) - or head over to the Pernille Bülow online shop (they ship almost worldwide and it's free if you buy for a certain amount). I have a suspicion their elves will be working overtime in the coming weeks as the Christmas decorations are the prettiest I've seen this year.

Is there anything that stood out to you about the decorations or Helen's mysig family Christmas at the cottage? 

Stay cosy friends!

Niki

Photography; Niki Brantmark / My Scandinavian Home (except for first and last cottage image by Helen)
Styling: Helen Sturesson 

*This post is a paid partnership with Pernille Bülow. All words and images are my own and I only ever work with brands I absolutely love and think you will too! Thank you for supporting the small Nordic businesses and ateliers that make My Scandinavian Home possible.

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