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A Charming Swedish Townhouse Where Old Meets New

There was something that immediately resonated with me when i first spotted this townhouse in the Gamle Enskede area of Stockholm. And then I read the blurb: 'an English townhouse' built in 1909 and designed by Victor Bodin.  

Needless to say, I've seen quite a few two-up, two-down formats like this in my childhood in London. But this is different. It has a distinct Scandinavian twist! Firstly, the wall between the kitchen and sitting room has been removed creating an airy open-space and secondly the decor is undeniably Swedish. It's also very unique. 

Think botanical wallpapers, scalloped edged rugs (I want one!), a vibrant gallery wall, candy stripes, pops of cherry red and a mix of antiques and modern day finds. Let's take a peek inside. 

I love this. It feels so familiar yet so unfamiliar at the same time. Sort of English cottage meets Swedish traditional meets Scandinavian contemporary - making the space truly unique. 

Is there anything that caught your eye about this wonderful house? 

While I couldn't find more homes like this to share, I did uncover a few lovely houses in the archive that I had forgotten about. If you have time this morning, dig into these: 


Have a fabulous start to the week! 

Niki

Photography courtesy of Skandia Mäklarna with thanks 

LATEST COMMENTS:

  1. I love the long slow low stairway.

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    Replies
    1. The stairways are lovely - especially with the big gallery wall as a backdrop!

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  2. I love the way they make a small home seem light, open and airy.

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  3. Yes, the best of both worlds! I too love the staircase with the artwork arranged to peruse as you travel. The tall casement windows to allow a breeze and lots of light. Also that it has a distinct foyer to separate the main area for those drafty, colder days. The kitchen working area is tight and beautifully arranged. And so curious as to where they placed the frig? Then, the traditional fireplace, textile patterns and woodwork all speaking Scandinavian. Such a charming place!
    Laura K

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    Replies
    1. So many great observations Laura! Thank you for mentioning the foyer - I forgot to write about that, but it is a very clever way to create a stop gap between the main living area and door, especially as entrances can be a bit drafty and hectic too!

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  4. I love it all - but what caught my eye is the art arranged behind the hand rail on the staircase. It doesn't take itself too seriously; it's perfect in it's imperfection.

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    1. Yes! Great observation. I love to see art hung in an informal or offbeat way!

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  5. Delightful home, full of fun and charm! I keep admiring the heating sources (stove, furnace, heater?) in all the Scandinavian homes and wondering what they are called. I love how a much needed and functional item has been made so beautiful. That lighting pendant in the kitchen is quite special.

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    1. The swedes call them 'kakelugn' - they are so beautiful and an amazingly efficient form of heat too.

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    2. Thank you for the information. Love hearing they are efficient and so aesthetically appealing!

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  6. It has such a cozy and comfortable feeling with light streaming from front to back. So, as the sun moves, light comes to both of the rooms during a day. I, too, like the closed off entrance area to keep winter drafts away. The kitchen is small but beautifully arranged, and cheerful.

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    Replies
    1. Thank you for mentioning the light, always an important aspect in any Swedish home. The entrance is a very clever idea, I agree!

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  7. Quirky and cozy--my favorites! I may be an outlier, but I love the hippo. It made me smile.

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