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Small spaces: a little summer cottage in the heart of the city

Cycling through Malmö, it's exciting to see all the bright green leaves spring to life on the trees after many months of dormancy. And across town, allotment season has begun! I was amazed to discover that Swedish allotments often have 'kolonistuga' - small inhabitable cottages in which you can live from late spring to early Autumn, providing a country oasis in the heart of the city. Do you have something similar in your country?

This pretty cottage was on the market last year and I was excited to see it snapped up by Hannes Mauritzson (who's apartment I once featured here). Located on 'Slottsskogskolonien' in Gothenburg, which I believe is the same allotment area as Elin Lannsjö's charming allotment, the cottage measures a teeny 27 m2 / 290 f2. Hannes has applied his own signature touch to the little cottage using a lick of paint and vintage touches - while some of the original wood still shines through. Take a quick peek at how it looked when Hannes bought it and then scroll down to see how the pretty cottage looks today! 

What a perfect place to tend to blooms, maybe grow a few veg, sip rosé and sleep over the summer, don't you think? His faithful four-legged friend Charlie certainly looks content! 

And just in case the Swedish weather gods aren't playing nicely (fair chance!) - there's always the wood burning stove too! 

Would you like to see more allotment cottages today? I've featured quite a few in the past: 


I hope these lovely spaces have filled you with inspiration today. 

Niki

Photography / credits: Hannes Mauritzson - shared with kind permission

LATEST COMMENTS:

  1. Possibly a strange question, but I've always wondered, do these small allotment homes have toilets? Adorable cottage.

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    1. That's a very good question! Generally, there are shared facilities - i.e. communal toilets and showers which many allotment owners share / Niki

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  2. This is the most charming cottage I've ever seen! Why couldn't one live there all year long with the stove? Or, could it be winterized? Gorgeous, and looks bigger than 290 sq ft!

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    1. It would be tempting! But sadly the water is switched off over the winter in these allotment sites to stop pipes from freezing. / Niki

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  3. In love with the cottage and the vibes are so peaceful and relaxing. Would love to know more about cottage like this one. :)

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    1. I agree, it's so lovely! I wrote a little more about these allotment cottages and the story behind them here: https://www.myscandinavianhome.com/2020/09/a-charming-little-allotment-cottage-in.html - so interesting! / Niki

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  4. We don't have any of these in Bergen where I live, only allotments without the small houses. But they do have some in Oslo. One of them was the setting for a popular children's TV-series, Portveien 2, making it a dream for lots of people. The do not have indoor plumbing, and are not for winter habitation. There is usually one or two houses with communal toilets. The law as well as local statutes states that they are not allowed for permanent habitation, but that you can stay there for the summer season.

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    1. Thank you for sharing this. Yes, it's the same in Sweden! :) / Niki

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  5. I recognized the charming cottage right away as I remembered it from your earlier post (hard not to - it is spectacular). And I remembered Charlie [the dog] as well, from our original post about Hannes' apartment.
    I am actually amazed by the size of the cottage (290 sq ft - that is the size of some New York City apartments!!!) and how well they seem to equipped. I browsed your older posts about allotment cottages and some them have kitchens bigger than mine.

    The wicker armchairs look so comfy. Thanks for revisiting the cottage, Niki, it made my heart sing.

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    1. I often think Scandinavians really excel at making the most of a small space. It also helps that many living spaces are clutter free which gives the illusion of space.
      I'm so happy you enjoyed this (and remember the other posts!) Alena! / Niki

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  6. This cottage is about the cutest thing I have ever seen!! Cute pup too! And, no, we don't have allotments in the USA. The concept is very foreign to me but I understand how beneficial it is in smaller countries.

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    1. I'm so curious - do you have allotment plots without cottages, or no allotments at all? In the UK they re quite common. My parents had one - I remember spending copious amounts of time there as a child begging Mum to go home! But I did love the produce from it! / Niki

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  7. Anything with sunshiny spaces and vintage touches is right up my alley. I have never heard of allotments in the US. In Michigan, the popular thing to do is to have a camper and go to campgrounds, or a cabin or cottage "up north" (which is anywhere north of where you live). I love hearing about summer lifestyles in other places--keep the posts coming, Niki! :)

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    1. I didn't know that allotments aren't a 'thing' in the US! We have them in the UK too but without the dwellings.
      Funny that it's popular to go North - presumably too escape the heat? Here, we all flock south in search of warmth!! / Niki

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    2. We go south in the winter to escape the snowy weather, and north in the summer to hopefully escape the heat. Most summer lodging, at least in Michigan, is close to or on a body of water. Swimming, boating, water sports, and fishing are very popular summertime activities.

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  8. This is such a friendly welcoming looking cottage. A little haven in the city.

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  9. We have "P-Patches" in Seattle. Tiny little plots with often many year waiting lists. I have a "large" patch at the community center near our cabin a couple of hours away. 10' by 20' and no cottage but a chair and a community tool shed and a community center where they have meals and concerts and yoga and lately even tango classes. The garden has been a wonderful way to meet other people that live out in the woods but are neighbors. It's also nice to have fresh herbs and flowers when the nearest store is 45 minutes away.

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