Latest Tiny Cabin Update: I Need Your Help!

It's been a while since I've updated you on the little cabin we're building in the grounds of Per's family's summer cottage (see our plans here). Word on the street in the Bjärehalvön is that the build will start in September (so exciting!). It's kind of crept up on me though and now I'm in a panic. This week, I started looking at windows and doors. It's safe to say, I'm starting from scratch with this, but learning fast. And I've narrowed it down to two options (hopefully): 

1. Doors that concertina up - like these fine specimens from Outline, seen here in a small Danish cabin of Lena at Peekaboo design. The beauty with these is that they still have a traditional touch but create a wonderful seamlessness between inside and out. 


2. The other option is to go for doors that open separately, like in this charming summer cabin below owned by Lina Kjellvertz (I once featured her fabulous Mallorcan house), designed by Sommarnöjen (Velfac sell similar doors). 

At this stage, I'm not even sure if option one is possible with, but it's worth investigating - so I thought I'd throw it out there.

Which do you think would work the best? 

Curious to see more Scandic-inspired tiny cabins today? I love: 


Or for something a little different, the before and after pictures of a Mercedes sprinter van which was converted into a tiny camper van are incredible! 

Wishing you all a wonderful weekend! 

Niki

Twitter FaceBook

Pin It
33

Period Charm, Pattern and Fabulous Paintwork in a Striking Swedish Home

I've been curious to know who is behind the interior design of this red brick Malmö house ever since it came on the market. Whoever it is has a passion for interior design - and worked really diligently to tell the tale of the property's past, which I absolutely love! From the outside, the classic green sash window frames and scent of traditional roses set the early 20th century scene, while inside, striking paintwork helps to enhance the period features. Keep a look out for smaller details such as the handprinted hall floor, stair rails and wallpaper - all of which help to tell the story of its past, while bringing a contemporary feel to the space. 

The entrance way sets the scene for a home that's full of contrast. 


At first glance it looks like tiling but look closely and you'll see the geometric pattern has been hand painted on wood. 

Side note: did you know, Sweden has a long tradition of painting wood floors? It dates back to the 18th century when simpler wood floors were painted to emulate more expensive materials such as stone or tiles. 

Notice the darker paint around the sash windows - which helps to make them more of a focal point. You can see the same idea in a more traditional environment in this Norwegian cabin. It's such a clever technique! 

A traditional masonry oven helps to heat both the sitting room and kitchen (although these days it's more for the 'mys' (cosy) factor!


I love the incredible windows in the dining area, which open right out, creating an indoor and outdoor feel in summertime, while complimenting the style of the house. 


Striking details and patterns! 

I love it when a small downstairs loo / guest bathroom is done up in a dramatic way - the bolder the better! 

The dark theme is carried through to the bedroom in the form of a vintage wardrobe - as well as in the hallway. 

The garden is filled with traditional lavender and roses (imagine the wildlife!) - which contrasts beautifully with a more contemporary outdoor seating area. 

Such a stunning house and garden. I am very tempted to go and see it, I must say. What do you think - worth a viewing? 

Is it me, or does it also have an English look and feel about it? Perhaps that's why it caught my eye! 

You can find out more info about the house here (in Swedish). 

Niki

Photography courtesy of Bolaget

Twitter FaceBook

Pin It
3

Before and After: A Traditional Norwegian Cabin Gets a Beautiful Colour Update

A few years ago, Berit stumbled across her dream croft surrounded by forest in Lunner, Hadeland, South-east Norway. The 50-metre square (538 sq.ft) cabin had great bones, but was in need of an update. Keen to put her own personal mark on it, Berit turned to Hytteliv magazine and interior designer Siv Brenne, who together with paint brand Jotun set to work on transforming the space while working to highlight the original features. The result is a peaceful retreat in soothing tones, and the perfect place to unwind. 

Kitchen before: 

Kitchen after: 

The kitchen has been given a fresh, calm update with wall panels in 1140 Sand, the ceiling in 471 Lys Antik (both LADY supreme finish matt) and the kitchen cabinets are from Bærum Kjøkkensenter, painted in colour s3005-B8OG. 

The sand shade has also been applied to the traditional-style sitting room area to give the living space a cohesive look. 

Master bedroom before:

When Beret bought the cabin, the small master bedroom was a sea of blues ranging from a more earthy shade to a bright sky blue. 

master bedroom after:

A soothing blue-grey tone (6315 Jade) was applied to the walls while the window frames were painted with a slightly darker 6232 Sjøalge to ensure the original features pop. Furniture and accessories in white and sand help to carry the theme through from the kitchen and sitting room. 

Guest bedroom before:

The guest bedroom was a riot of blue and red - which I am not opposed to since it gives it an air of traditional Norwegian country. However, the transformation is so charming....

After:

The top bunk is mounted on the wall to give an airy touch to the small room (I'm curious to know if the walls would hold this at our summer cottage - I'd love to do something similar!). The walls and beds have been painted in a lovely light 1376 Froströk, while the door and window frame have been given a darker 6232 Sjøalge treatment to match the master bedroom). 

Bathroom before:

After: 

The bathroom has also been given a traditional touch with antique furniture against a backdrop of wood panels painted in calming 4017 Pilasterblå. The blind is from Green Apple and bench is from Lama. 

The exterior was also given aan update. A dramatic 734 Brunsvart (brown-black) was a applied to the wood panels and been paired with window frames in a softer 1376 Froströk and shutters in 4252 Kimrök Dämpad - creating a wonderful cohesive look between outdoors and indoors. 

What a lovely update! I love the soothing palette. It demonstrates just how important it is to work with a cohesive colour scheme before you start to decorate. 

Is there anything that stood out to you? 

For more fab before and afters, check out this archive - some really incredible ones in there! Also, take a peek in the Norway homes archive - a favourite of mine! 

A couple of other things before I head off:

If you subscribe to My Scandinavian Home via e-mail, the feedburner will no longer work from tomorrow onwards (unfortunately) so I'm working on a new solution in order for you to continue receiving my posts straight to your inbox! I'll be back soon with more info!

And secondly, my article: Handmade Tale: The Rise of Handcrafts for the Home is now live over at IMM Cologne online magazine if you fancy a read! I love this movement, it makes me so happy! I hope it inspired you, too.

I'll be back tomorrow with a beautiful Scandi home tour. See you then! 

Niki

Photography courtesy of Hytteliv & Jotun

Twitter FaceBook

Pin It
2

A Cosy Outdoor Oasis Gets a String Lighting Update




MSH Partnership*
They say the best things come to those who wait. I was thinking about this the other day, and asked Per: 'do you think we'd appreciate the Swedish summer as much, if the winter wasn't so harsh'? The truth is, I don't think we would. There's something about the plants and flowers bursting into life after lying dormant and the warm sunshine on your skin after months of covering up. I know I'm not alone - the joy on my Nordic friends' faces when the good weather arrives is palpable. And we don't want to waste a second of it!

Life moves outside - and our garden becomes our home. One of my favourite places to hang out, is under the honeysuckle at our friends the Wilsons (a family of Brits who moved to Malmö from Australia a few years back). Think comfy seating, cosy blankets and the sweet scent of honeysuckle. All that was missing was the lighting.

Lighting is often neglected or added as an impromptu afterthought in an outdoor space, but it's equally as important as indoor lighting. Get it right and you can accentuate your favourite features as well as create a cosy oasis after sunset. 

As you know from my own back yard, I'm a big fan of Pernille Bülow ReUse String Lights, and knew they were erm, the missing 'link' (see what I did there?!). 


They are handmade in the Pernille Bülow atelier on the Danish island of Bornholm and every piece is mouth blown from recycled waste glass (look closely and you'll see the beautiful bubbles!). 

Also, the chains, which are made up of 9 lights and 3 metres long, can be linked together so you only need one power outlet (power sources are a challenge in most outdoor spaces so this is really handy).  

 

And best of all, they emit a lovely warm glow! 


Sarah has added a load of other lovely touches under her lean-to - such as a mirror. In the right place, mirrors can help accentuate favourite elements, reflect light and other plants and flowers as well as visually extend small spaces. Perfect!

If you live in a country where it gets a bit chilly at night - lighting candles and keeping a basket of blankets at hand are a perfect way to stay toasty and prolong the evening! 

Such a pretty spot, don't you think? 

I think I might just hang out here all summer. I hope the Wilsons don't mind.

Read more about Pernille Bülow ReUse String Lighting here

In case you're curious about other items, the ReUse collection is constantly growing and currently includes a lamp, drinking glasses and jugs as well as a number of other lovely pieces (seen in my home here) - all designed to use as much waste glass as possible. 

Oh, and they ship almost worldwide

As always, pleased do give me a shout in the comment section below if you've got any questions about anything in these pics!

Har det så bra! 

Niki

Photography by me - styling with the help of the entire Wilson clan! 

*This post is a paid partnership with Pernille Bülow. However, all words and images are my own and I only ever work with brands I absolutely love and think you will too! Thank you for supporting the small Nordic businesses and ateliers that make My Scandinavian Home possible.

Twitter FaceBook

Pin It
2

Pretty Summer Touches in an Idyllic Swedish cottage

You might recognise the lovely home of Anna-Maria Blomqvist from this wintery tour. But Swedish homes can look completely different in summertime (who knows, I'm might even come back to this one in the Autumn too!). There's something special about the light, the flowers and outdoor space that make cottages feel extra special at this time of year. Anna-Maria's 19th century cottage in Sigtuna - known for having Sweden's oldest high street, is particularly idyllic in summertime. I hope this tour gives a few ideas for your own home and outdoor living space! 

Oh so lovely! We've been having great weather lately here in Sweden too so I can imagine the family have been making good use of their garden! 

I hope I haven't jinxed it now.... eeeek!

Wishing you all a lovely, sunny start to the week.

Niki

Twitter FaceBook

Pin It
3

skovby ad


 

site by Ana Degenaar

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website.
MORE INFO