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Malene and Jeppe's Pastel Copenhagen Home - With Lots of Dots!

A few weeks ago Denmark announced that residents from Skåne county in Sweden are allowed back over the bridge! I honestly did a little dance. Oh, how I've missed my trips to Copenhagen! Until I manage to make the trip, I'm going to continue to get my fill of fabulous Danish design from the homes of creatives across Denmark - I hope you'll join me! Today, let's take a virtual tour of the fab home of Jeppe, Malene and their two young children Hugo and Sonja. The family live in a 200 m2 (2152 ftsq) apartment in Vesterbro, a hip neighbourhood in the Danish capital. Malene works as a production manager for achingly cool Danish clothing brand ENVII (check out @envii_official) and Jeppe is a carpenter. The latter comes in handy for their home renovations - which they do entirely by themselves. Welcome to a world of pastels, prints and lots of dots! 


"For us, it is important that it feels warm and cosy in our home. We love having friends and family over - and we like to ensure the furniture and styling doesn't feel too strict or 'smart' - you need to feel that people live here" - Malene. 

The dining room wall has been painted in Aloe Vera from Dyrup and a set of Hans J. Wegner wishbone chairs* have been arranged around the table. 

The prints are from Jenny Brandt Grönberg (who's sitting room I featured here), Nynne Rosenvinge, Clara Selina Bach and Galerie Maeght, among others. 

Malene picked up the little stool at Søstrene Grene and painted the legs lilac to match the cushions. 

In the master bedroom, Malene has combined beige 'Cuppa Coffee' paint from Dyrup with pink accents (including sustainable bedding from JUNA Design). The wall-mounted nightstand was handcrafted by Trævarefabrikernes and the wall lamp and stool are from IKEA. 


"I love pastel colours, and I fall in love each time I see something pink or dotty!" - Malene. 


In the bathroom, Malene and Jeppe have instilled tiles from Marokk and accessorised the space with an H&M basket and a Fine Little Day 'Swimmers' print

The hallway has been painted in Deco Pink from Jotun Lady and the wall-mounted unit is from Trævarefabrikernes (as before).

***

Such a lovely home! I particularly love the pastels, they're fun yet calming all at once. 

Is there anything that stood out to you about Jeppe and Malene's home? 

See more pictures over at @londogmussehuset!

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We're currently island hopping on Sweden's West coast, sailing, swimming, crabbing and enjoying everything the Swedish summer has to offer (even if it could be a few degrees warmer and not raining like it is today - BAAAH!!). I've promised my little family to take next week off while we capture this wonderful area together to create a guide of our favorite islands once we return. I hope you'll feel inspired to visit once day!

In the meantime, you might like to explore the archives which hold THOUSANDS of beautiful Scandi-inspired homes - here are a few of my favorite categories: 


Have a wonderful week friends, I hope the sun shines for you (and returns here!!). 

See you Monday 3rd August. 

Niki

Photography courtesy of Malene & Jeppe / @londogmussehuset shared with kind permission.

*This post includes affiliate links

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An Afternoon Tea In My Backyard - Fit For Royalty!

 Scandinavian brand story*:
An afternoon tea fit for royalty. That's how it felt in my little back yard a couple of weeks back. And I owe that to Georg Jensen. Last spring, the Danish brand announced an extension of one of its most recognisable tabletop collections designed by the Swedish designer Sigvard Bernadotte (1907 - 2002). And I couldn't be more excited! Formerly a Prince, the forward thinking and free spirited Sigvard Bernadotte, traded his aristocratic title to become part of Sweden's design royalty. His collaboration with Georg Jensen began in 1930 at the start of the functionalist movement and the bold simplicity of Bernadotte's silver designs were a huge over night success. In 2002, Georg Jensen reissued many of the items in stainless steel making them more accessible to the humble likes of you and I! Just add coffee, milk, and buns. OK, I did have a little prosecco later on in the day too...!

If this is a royal collection, then the Bernadotte Thermo jug is surely the queen - it's a true Scandinavian design icon. I love how it keeps your drinks hot (or cold) for up to six hours too - a perfect excuse to sit around all day! 

Another favorite: the Bernadotte dish on a stand. I used it for bread, but it also makes a beautiful fruit bowl! 

I was excited to see that in 2019, Georg Jensen added several new pieces to the line, including a series of vases, serving plates and platters, cutlery pieces and other small items - all of which respect the design heritage of the Bernadotte line. 

There's something wonderful about using milk jug (as oppose to just chucking the entire carton on the table we so often do at breakfast time) - and this stainless steel and mirror polished one is the crème de la crème (see what I did there?!). I love the shape and weight! It's also perfect for other things like salad dressings. 




What a wonderful afternoon! I'll be dreaming about this come winter!

If you love iconic Scandinavian design as much as I do and curious about the Bernadotte line and other Georg Jensen pieces I've used for my table setting, here's a quick guide: 
GET THE LOOK

1. Bernadotte Thermo Jug
2. Bernadotte Dish on A Stand
3. Bernadotte Creamer / Milk Jug
4. Bernadotte Bottle Opener
5. Bernadotte Etagère
6. Bernadotte Tea and Coffee Spoons
7. Cobra Lunch Plate
8. Cobra Porcelain Cup
9. Cobra Glass Set
10. Bernadotte Medium Vase

Do you have a favourite piece?

Wishing you a wonderful start to the week!

Niki

Photography: My Scandinavian Home
Styling: Helen Sturesson

PS I'll be back on Wednesday with an inspiring and beautiful Swedish home tour - never been seen before! See you then!

*This post is brought to you in partnership with Georg Jensen, who I am honoured to collaborate with. Thank you for supporting the wonderful businesses that make My Scandinavian Home possible. 

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A Vibrant Aarhus Home - Sustainably Decorated, Danish Style

I love Scandinavian homes with tones of earthy green, grey or chestnut accents. But every now and then a Danish home pops up with vibrant hues which catch the light and brighten up my feed. They are like a happy breath of fresh air! Tanja Gotthardsen's apartment in Aarhus is one of those. Her interior is full of wonderful vintage finds and colourful art, and accessories against a backdrop of luminescent blue and pink. I wrote to Tanja to find out more about her lovely Aarhus home and was excited to discover that there's more than to the apartment than meets the eye. Tanja is a huge advocate for sustainability. The Dane runs a consultancy business which helps sustainable brands and businesses communicate their efforts and her home is testimony to her commitment to using sustainable brands. Read on to find out more!

How do you work with brands?
At the mom moment, so many businesses are greenwashing, rather than doing the actual work. I strive to help make the honest, ethical and environmentally responsible brands stand out from the crowd. I also hold public talks, panel debates and run a consumer oriented blog, where we discuss subjects such as material innovation and human rights - subjects that are also touched upon on my instagram

How does your own home decor reflect your ambition?
My decor is primarily made up of second hand finds which I've collected over the years having visited everything from flea markets and thrift shops to more curated vintage boutiques. I also have a few more recent purchases from sustainable brands that I've worked with. 

Are there any particular Scandinavian home decor brands you would recommend? 
For sustainably made furniture, I would look towards TAKT CPH and Make Nordic. Their furniture and materials are certified sustainable, and they put a lot of effort into ensuring pieces that will last a lifetime. Our couch is from Make Nordic

For softer elements, such as cushions, throws and bedding, I would suggest Mumutane (socio-economic), Ordinary Things (organic and socially responsible) and Aiayu (organic and socially responsible). 

For vintage / secondhand I would keep an eye on Curated CPH for art prints and The Basement for furniture, lamps and vases. 

The wall colours in your home are so beautiful - is the paint also from a sustainable brand?
The paint I've used is what we call in danish 'naturmaling' - it's a chalk-based paint without any harsh additives. It's made locally by Linoliebutikken - run by a couple who have developed the chalk-paint over the decades. They use the most beautiful pigments in their paints, and it makes the walls extremely vibrant and changeable throughout the day.  
    

Do you have any tips on how to decorate our homes in a more sustainable way?  
Absolutely. My best tip is to remember that the most sustainable item, is the one you already own. Use as much as you can of what you already have. When you want to purchase something new, be honest and ask yourself: "how much will I actually use and treasure this?" After that, start asking questions about how sustainable it is. Many brands postulate sustainability but can't elaborate. Ask them how they ensure it is environmentally friendly and ethically made. You may initially find it difficult to discern the trustworthiness of their answers, but the very act of asking the question will in itself push for change. 

If you wish to learn more, we're am entire community of sustainability advocates that can teach you how to dig deeper. 

Follow Tanja's instagram @tanjagotthardsen for more info! 

What a beautiful home! - The colours, the furniture, the accessories, everything!

Thank you so much to Tanja for sharing these pictures and talking about how to create a more sustainable home - the Danish way. Truly inspiring! 

My first stop is that paint shop! 

I'd love to hear your thoughts in the comment section below. 

How about kicking off the week with a tour of more delightful Aarhus homes? 


Wishing you aa wonderful start to the week! See you Wednesday*

Niki

Photography: Tanja Gotthardsen - shared with kind permission
*I'll be posting three days a week over the summer in order to wind down and spend a little more time with family (Monday, Wednesday and Friday)

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Angela's Inspiring Light-Filled Munich Home (With The Cutest Snoozing Pup!)

You'd be forgiven for thinking the beautiful home of Angela Giovanna is in Sweden. There's something about the light and airy, pared back feel, gallery walls and designer pieces that give it a distinct Scandinavian vibe. And then there's those wonderful towering ceilings, huge windows and double conjoining doors that flood the space with light. I couldn't put my finger on what exactly, but there was still something about the architecture that gave the game away and I figured the building had to be in Germany. Angela shares her wonderful home in the old section of Munich with husband Tommi and their furry friend Juno (the pair are expecting their first child in September (a baby boy!).  The duo have decorated look their apartment using a  strictly monochrome theme with vintage furniture nestled beside a multitude of New Nordic design pieces, books and art. I reached out to find out more. Meine Damen und Herren, allow me to present Angela's inspiring home!

An Ivar cabinet from IKEA has been painted to match the colour of the wall - a simple, clever way to add storage without drawing attention to it. 

What drew you to the apartment in the first place? 
We love the typical style of the old buildings in this area and were so happy to finally find our dream home last winter. Since then we have been slowly filling it with a lot of good memories and creating an interior we love. 

A series of decorative objects including an echasse bowl*David fragment sculpture and decorative coral have been arranged beside design books, magazines art and a lamp (from Westwing) in the sitting room. 

How would you describe your style?
I would define our style as a mix of design classics, vintage pieces and trend influences.  

Was a monochrome palette a deliberate choice, or has it evolved organically?
I love colours, but since I change my mind so often, I decided to go with a more monochrome scheme. It's timeless. 

Marshall bluetooth speakers* rest atop a vintage cabinet. Above, a series of decorative objects and design books have been displayed on Swedish String Pocket shelves

Do you have any favourite pieces? 
The pieces I love the most in our home are the ones that tell a story. We have a strong emotional attachment to some - like a vintage picture frame that my father gave me almost 20 years ago - and the glass cabinet in our home office (seen above). We also love to upcycle old flea market finds to create something new. 

There are many great German interior bloggers / instagrammers out there to follow for inspiration. Do you have any favourites? 
Yes, I love to follow @Sarah-cocolapine, @svenja_traumzuhause and @oursweetliving

Nothing like a snoozing dog! Being a non-dog owner, I'm curious, I heard something from training 101 that allowing a dog on the sofa is a complete no-no - is this true? 
Haha! Very good question! Before we got Juno, I was super convinced that I would be strict and not allow her on the sofa or bed. But when she was a puppy, she cried a lot during the night - so we allowed her to sleep in our bed. That was a big mistake - haha! She still completely owns them! 

On a different note, I noticed on your instagram @tasselsandfringes that you recently re-painted her dining room wall from dark to light. It looks fab (I couldn't resist sharing a couple of snapshots below) what made you decide to do this? 
Thank you! I really loved it in the dark colour, it gave the dining room a 'restaurant feeling' and was super cosy when lit with candles. But with coronavirus, the dining area became my home office and was simply too dark. In order to sit there eight hours a day, I needed to brighten it up. I love the light beige tone, it made a huge difference to the space. 

Such a lovely home! 

I can't wait to see what you do next - especially with a nursery to create - exciting times! 

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You can see more of Angela's home and follow her future projects over at @tasselsandfringes

I've shared quite a few other lovely homes from Munich in the past (there must be a real creative hub over there!) - check out these if you're curious:


I've had Munich on my list of places I could live one day thanks to its proximity to the Alps - in the winter, you can hit the slopes whenever you like - luxury! Lake Garda in Italy is only 6 hours away too, just saying!

Wishing you a great day friends! I'll be back tomorrow with a beeeeautiful danish home, so make sure you stop by! 

Niki

Photography: Angela Giovanna 
Affiliate links marked with *

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5 Simple Steps To Hosting A Swedish Midsummer

Tomorrow is Midsummer's Eve, one of the most important dates in the Swedish calendar and second only to Jul (Christmas). Up and down the country, our Nordic friends are flocking to Systembolaget (the state-owned off-licence) to pick up beer and schnapps before it closes for the holidays. Midsummer celebrations usually take place in the countryside so tomorrow the city streets will be deserted. Sadly, this year dancing like 'frogs' (long story) around a maypole on the village green won't be on the agenda. But this won't stop the revelry! Inte alls! Famous for experiencing all four seasons in one day, nothing yet nothing gets in the way of raising a glass (or two) to the summer solstice! Devoted to eating, drinking, dancing and other assorted pagan rituals, Swedish midsummer has been around since the 1500s. Why not channel the swedes and hold your own midsummer celebration? As with all things Scandinavian, its super simple and doesn't require a lot of effort. Here are some tips to get you started:

1. Midsommarkrans (Midsummer crown):  In my humble opinion, the most beautiful floral crowns  are handmade with whatever you have to hand from nearby meadows or hedgerows. Above, Elsa Billgren is in the process of creating a daisy crown on the island Gotland - and below are a few snaps of my daughters and I gathering wildflowers last year near our summer cottage. Wilted, bent and some very far from perfect, but oh so pretty all the same! Here's a simple tutorial on how to create a floral crown



 2. Set a simple table: the midsummer table is rustic and understated. Think wildflowers, candles for when the revelry continues well into the early hours and a spot for everyone - young and old and even furry friends - at the table.

It wouldn't be midsummer in Sweden without a down pour - so anoraks are a must! But if the weather really is THAT bad, it might be time to reluctantly move the festivities indoors, in which case, it's all about bringing the summer in! 

3: The drinks: Think refreshing ice cold water infused with elderflower, cucumber and lemon, Swedish craft beers and of course, a 'nubbe' of akvavit - taken with a nubbevisa (akvavit song). 

4. The midsummer feast! Dine on sill (pickled herring), boiled new potatoes with dill and a variety of salmon before tucking into some deliciously sweet, juicy summer strawberries (FYI the recipe for the layered strawberry cake can be found over at Honestly Yum). 

5. Single? According to Swedish tradition, pluck seven types of flowers and place them under your pillow. You'll dream of your future husband or wife! 

Wishing you a 'glad midsummer'!

See you Monday!

Niki

Photography:
1. Emily Slotte 2. Elsa Billgren 3-5 My Scandinavian Home 6, Nåde studio, 7&8 Homespo, 9 Abby Mitchell Events, 10 Wedding Chicks  11 & 12 - Honestly Yum.

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