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This Romantic Swedish Art Nouveau Villa Could Be Yours!

Good morning friends, how was your weekend? Monday morning has only just begun and I'm already at my desk in our urban townhouse, dreaming about a move to this romantic Swedish countryside villa (so, that's new? LOL!). But when you see the pictures, you'll probably understand! The early 20th century art nouveau villa dates back to 1910 and with a heavy heart (I'm sure), the artist owner has decided to put it on the market. They say fortune favours the brave, and for anyone willing to take on the project in rural Flen, in Södermanland County, west of Stockholm, this magnificent property is all yours! Think large spacious rooms and magnificent windows which flood the space with light and provide breathtaking views of the surrounding countryside. Many of the original features are still intact including the large masonry stoves and wood floor are still intact, so it's just to add your very own personal touch! 

Could you imagine moving here just in time for winter? 

Oh, the ways I could make this place my own. And don't even get me started on the garden. I'm not sure we're quite ready to move 500 km though! 

More details here

Dream about other Scandinavian country homes today in this archive.

And a quick reminder to make the most of the 20% discount at Bemz with code MSHfall - a perfect opportunity to get a new slipcover for your sofa like these, update with cushions, or refresh your bedroom in time for autumn (see my recent makeover)! 

Wishing you all a wonderful start to the week! 

Niki

Photography courtesy of Historiska Hem

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7 Styling Tricks To Learn From a Serene Swedish Apartment

While yesterday's home tour was all about colour and playful elements, this Swedish apartment is all about serenity. When I pour over the pictures of the milky white tones, minimalist decor and soft touches of light wood I feel my shoulders instantly relax. So, what's the trick to creating an oasis of calm for one? Here are seven clever styling elements at play: 

1. Keeping key furniture white helps to keep the look uncluttered, while mixing and matching different designs helps to keep the look interesting. 

2. A very large white fluffy, shag-pile rug adds texture and warmth as well as helps to dampen sound. 

3. Playing with scale immediately adds interest to a space. In the main living room / bedroom a large pendant lamp floats in the centre. 

4. Elfa storage is hugely popular in Sweden as it's really practical and can be tailored to the space you have. These shelves maximise storage by extending all the way up to the ceiling. And great storage also means a clutter-free room. I'd love to see a little more this space, preferably with some closed storage to hide a load of stuff! 

5. A mirror doubles up as a 'looking glass' but also as a tool to reflect light inwards, visually enlarging the room 

'You' print by Sofia Lind*

6. Bucket storage is ideal for storing books and magazines (I also love to use it in children's rooms as it's so easy to find what you're looking for!). This one is the Douve by Bloomingville*

7. Soft earthy colours help to break up the white look while keeping the aesthetic calm and natural. 

Arum wall lamp* by Ferm Living (I have the same one in my bedroom but in beige). 

Beautiful! I could totally imagine rocking about here, could you? 

It's a bit small for my family, but if you're interested, it's for sale here

On a different note - I'm not sure if you noticed my announcement the other day - but I'll be blogging four days a week for the time being, with Fridays off. So on this note - I'll leave you to have a fabulous weekend and see you on Monday! 

Niki

Photography: Alvhem
*This post contains affiliate links.

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A Beautiful Rustic Home in Rural North Sweden

Do you ever romanticise about moving somewhere remote, wild and windswept? I often wonder what it might be like to live in the far North of Sweden, where the sun set marks a month of darkness, the sky lit by the beauty of the Northern lights. Maybe one day I'll make my move. For now, I'll live through others. And one of my favourite homes is that of garden designer Fanny Lindén and her family . You might recognise Fanny's beautiful, rustic home from these Christmas and Spring features. And this morning I stumbled across these images captured by Lina Östling and Mari Strenghielm (see her lovely former home on an island!) who paid Fanny a visit last year. The pictures give you a glimpse into family life and a world where the beauty is in the imperfection. Vintage and antique pieces proudly bear the hallmarks of time, and the doors are thrown open to a world where everyone is welcome - children, cats, chickens and whoever else chooses to wander in! Välkommen! 

So beautiful! 

I love the bright yellow barn door and vibrant Falu red facade, imagine how lovely it looks against the snow in wintertime! 

I can't tell you how tempted I am to live like this (maybe a gap year - as a former Londoner it would be a WAY too big step to make the move permanent off the bat, I'd need to test the waters first!). Could you imagine living somewhere rural? Or perhaps you already do? 

Other Rural Scandinavian homes to love this weekend:


Wishing you a wonderful couple of days - see you Monday! 

Niki

Photography: Lina Östling Styling: Mari Strenghielm - shared with kind permission. 

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Period Charm, Pattern and Fabulous Paintwork in a Striking Swedish Home

I've been curious to know who is behind the interior design of this red brick Malmö house ever since it came on the market. Whoever it is has a passion for interior design - and worked really diligently to tell the tale of the property's past, which I absolutely love! From the outside, the classic green sash window frames and scent of traditional roses set the early 20th century scene, while inside, striking paintwork helps to enhance the period features. Keep a look out for smaller details such as the handprinted hall floor, stair rails and wallpaper - all of which help to tell the story of its past, while bringing a contemporary feel to the space. 

The entrance way sets the scene for a home that's full of contrast. 


At first glance it looks like tiling but look closely and you'll see the geometric pattern has been hand painted on wood. 

Side note: did you know, Sweden has a long tradition of painting wood floors? It dates back to the 18th century when simpler wood floors were painted to emulate more expensive materials such as stone or tiles. 

Notice the darker paint around the sash windows - which helps to make them more of a focal point. You can see the same idea in a more traditional environment in this Norwegian cabin. It's such a clever technique! 

A traditional masonry oven helps to heat both the sitting room and kitchen (although these days it's more for the 'mys' (cosy) factor!


I love the incredible windows in the dining area, which open right out, creating an indoor and outdoor feel in summertime, while complimenting the style of the house. 


Striking details and patterns! 

I love it when a small downstairs loo / guest bathroom is done up in a dramatic way - the bolder the better! 

The dark theme is carried through to the bedroom in the form of a vintage wardrobe - as well as in the hallway. 

The garden is filled with traditional lavender and roses (imagine the wildlife!) - which contrasts beautifully with a more contemporary outdoor seating area. 

Such a stunning house and garden. I am very tempted to go and see it, I must say. What do you think - worth a viewing? 

Is it me, or does it also have an English look and feel about it? Perhaps that's why it caught my eye! 

You can find out more info about the house here (in Swedish). 

Niki

Photography courtesy of Bolaget

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A 19th Century House Ready for Summer, On The Swedish Island of Gotland

Linda and Martin Bendelin Munkhammar grew up on the Swedish summer paradise island of Gotland before moving to Stockholm for higher education and work. But when they had their first child, they longed for their home turf and wanted to give their children the idyllic childhood they had enjoyed on the Swedish Baltic island. The pair fell in love with a dilapidated old 19th century limestone house near the coast in Djupvik in Southwestern Gotland which was in major need of repair. After extensive work - the beautiful house has become their home - and a place where children can roam free in the garden surrounded by lavender, and Linda and Martin can enjoy morning dips on the nearby beach. The interior offers a cool respite from the long hours of sunshine - and features cool, exposed stone, original wood beams and beautifully textured walls inspired by the surrounding landscape. Let's take the tour!









How beautiful! 

I understand why they wanted to go home, do you?

Gotland really is a wonderful island, and really comes into its' own in summertime. But more so, I bet the locals really appreciate the end of summer when the tourists pile onto the last ferry back to the mainland and the island quietens down and readies itself for a raw yet revitalising winter! 

See the full feature in Residence magazine here (in Swedish). 

Photography: Emma Jönsson Dysell - shared with kind permission

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