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A Serene White Swedish Home with Warm Touches of Wood

Come here for a breather today? You're in the right place! Decorated by Grey Deco in nuances of white and furnished with pieces in an array of natural material like wood, cane and linen, the living space is a total breath of fresh air and a wonderful oasis in the heart of Gothenburg. Although styled for sale, I can totally imagine stepping inside and filling it with my own personal touches, how about you? 

Note how the washing machine is in the bathroom. In Sweden this is very common in apartments. It's either that or a communal 'tvättstuga' (laundry room), where you book a time slot (the subject of numerous exasperated conversations - everyone has a 'tvättstuga' story - usually a note that has been left by another irate user! 

In the UK, washing machines tend to be in the kitchen (if you don't have a separate laundry room or mudroom). 

Where does the laundry tend to happen in your country? 

On a separate note, the subtle nuances in this apartment are so lovely. My guess is that they've used something like 'Classic white' on the ceiling (NCS S0500-N) and then Jotun Tidlös on the sitting room and bedroom wall.

Wishing you all a serene day!

Niki

PS I am so excited about the before and after home tour I have lined up for tomorrow - it's full of vintage finds! See you then! 

LATEST COMMENTS:

  1. How serene. Nice tour. In my part of the midwest USA, usually there is a separate laundry/storage room in apartments (or there is a communal laundry area). In my first "adult" apartment, I had a washer and dryer in my half bath, which I thought worked out well. I enjoy seeing how different countries approach floor plans--thanks for pointing that out!

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    1. So interesting - it sounds like everything very well planned out! It definitely makes sense to have a washer and dryer in the bathroom.

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  2. I am in Canada and the houses usually have a separate laundry room (older homes in dingy basements but newer or renovated homes have nicer spaces). in the apartments it is wherever there is space (usually stacked units in a small closet) or a communal space in rental buildings (I hated communal laundry rooms, they are the worst, so having a washer in the unit was my No1 condition when buying my own apartment). My building used to be a rental building so we still have a communal laundry room, but people have been slowly adding washers where they can. Mine is in the closet on the other side of the kitchen sink wall, hooked into the sink supply/drain. Works well.

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    1. I know exactly what you mean about the communal laundry spaces. We used to have one in our first flat in Sweden and it was always really booked up. If you weren't quick enough you could only get times at 7am on a Saturday - and if you overslept, it would be dirty clothes for another week! I also remember all the angry notes people would leave for one another. There are even Facebook groups dedicated to this in Sweden!

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    2. That's interesting re: facebook groups. I think Swedes are much concerned with order of things than here. I have never lived in the building where the laundry room is reserved or a machine booked. It was always first come first served so I had to get up super early on a weekend to do a load. Also, if you left your laundry sitting in a machine (wet or dry) when done (say if you went back up to your apartment and forgot to come back down at the exact time it was done), people would take your laundry out and put it on top of the machine to load theirs. I had to sit there waiting for the load to be done. Such a waste of time and also sometimes pretty scary. Also, things would be stolen from the machines. The. Worst.

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  3. What a beautiful tour - thank you so much - the last few have certainly been brightening up these dull January days! I absolutely love the table/magazine holder in this one - any idea where it is from please? Or something similar?

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    1. I love the book holder too - it caught my eye while I was writing the post. Unfortunately I am not sure where it's from, I hope someone else can help. If I find something similar I'll pop back!

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    2. Beth, you can get a similar one on Amazon. The link is to Canadian Amazon, the item would be significantly cheaper in the US.
      https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B001F5RSJA?slotNum=10&ots=1&ascsubtag=[]st[p]cjsz5ch6d0051nxy625xhe2gh[i]iyrG3L[u]1[t]w[r]google.ca[d]D[z]m&linkCode=gs2&imprToken=e2bf3a1e-cc1e-102a-e5c&tag=voxcan-20

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  4. Love the white with subtle touches of wood. In my last two apartments, our washer and dryer have been stacked in their own hall closet. Most buildings also have communal laundry rooms with larger, industrial-sized machines that are available to everyone on the floor/building. You need a pre-paid card to use them.

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    1. That's a new one - the hallway! I like it. We have big communal laundry rooms here too, we had one in the building of my first flat in Sweden, I have to say it used to drive me insane - I'm simply not organised enough!

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  5. in Australia mostly a separate laundry if space is an issue in the bathroom. We saved a lot of $'s not to mention space when we pulled out a broken dishwasher in the kitchen (hadn't worked in 14yrs and became a spice rack :) and put a front loader washing machine in. Interesting watching people's reactions. It makes perfect sense to us

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    1. Great use of space - although you did lose a spice rack - LOL! I agree that kitchen washing machines do make sense!

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  6. In the Czech Republic, 90 percent of washing machines are in the bathroom.

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    1. Interesting - very similar to Swedish homes.

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    2. So was ours, when I grew up. :-)

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    3. So was ours wen I was growing up in Bosnia. They still are in the washrooms back home.

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  7. Love the coffee table! So elegant and timeless. Wish we had furniture like that i the States. Thank you!

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    1. Yes, thank you for pointing this out, it is indeed a beautiful table!

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  8. from the french woman : in france it depends of the location and the age of the home (and of course of the surface). and of the model of the washing machine (opening by the top or by the front). In old small/middle flats in Paris (and old quarters downtown in others big cities), often top machine in the bathroom( mine was stuck between bath and sink every time at paris), in newer ones, front opening in the kitchen. In houses frequently in a dedicated room, sometimes in the garage. mine (washing, drying) are front opening side by side in a dedicated room with everything related with clothes : sewing machines, ironing, etc... My current home is an old and big one from my ancestors, but i am selling it, because of my disabillity. I have never seen a common cleaning room in france.

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  9. Finland it is very similar to Sweden: in apartment buildings people put washing machines and dryers into bathrooms. It is very typical that there is also a "tvättstuga" (communal laundry rooms) and also dryer room (yes a room with a larger equipment creating warm air flow, very handy to dry larger items like bed linen) with timeslot booking. In new building even the floorplan is typically such that there is a dedicated place for washing machine in bathroom. It makes also sense as the bathrooms have requirement to have a water-tight layer, kitchens do not. In houses (detached, semi-detached, terraced house) washing machines and dryers are typically also in separate laundry rooms or in the bathroom. Even though the bathroom is quite standard, it seems that all women in Finland dream, is a spaceous separate laundry room in their house / apartment, at least if you read blogs or watch renovation reality tv shows.

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