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Feeling The Zen From 'The House of Silence'

The House of Silence. What a lovely name. And the space certainly lives up to it. Designed and visualised by Maria Marinina in 2018, the 62 square metre (667 square foot) is surrounded by woodland and combines a wealth of natural materials from cool stone to warm wood which add contrast and interest to the largely neutral scheme. The space also pays homage to many of the hottest interior trends right now, including pivoted screen doors (love these!), sculptured furniture, asymmetric mirrors, dried flowers and subtle textiles in cream, pink-rust and tan hues, all off which contribute warmth and softness to the open-plan living space. Welcome to the world of Zen!






GET THE LOOK

1. Fringe mirror / Ben & Aja Blanc (if you feel like getting creative, there's a DIY here!)

I wonder how quickly your pulse would lower just walking through the door?! Sure, these pictures were taken immediately after the project was finished so unless you were a total neatnik you'd have a load more stuff (I speak for myself here!) - but I think the natural materials would still shine through and bring a huge sense of calm. 

Is this your kind of style?

See more pictures of The House of Silence, and the floor plan here

Thank you so much to Desire To Inspire for the tip!

Are you doing anything this evening? It's Valborgsmässoafton (try pronouncing that!!) here in Sweden. Known as Walpurgis night in English, every 30th of April local communities in Sweden gather around bonfires and sing to welcome spring to the northern shores! Let's just hope the rain holds off! 

Have a Zen day!

Niki

Design & Visualisation: Maria Marinina 



LATEST COMMENTS:

  1. Replies
    1. You might have to be my room mate as I am also planning on moving in!

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  2. Some of this I like. However, I'd be very depressed living in these colours for any length of time. Too drab.

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    1. I too, would need to add some colour / brightness. The bones are fairly neutral so I guess the key would be to use the shell and then add your own stamp on the space with all the colours you love!

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  3. It is a bit too austere for my taste but it is undeniably beautiful. Every piece is thoughtfully selected and gorgeous on its own. Really well put together. I would love to spend a vacation or a long weekend here, it would be really restful.

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    1. I agree, it's the perfect weekend retreat (in fact, it reminds me a little of the magical mountain cabin I featured in my book The Scandinavian Home and happen to stay at for a long weekend once). Maria really is so amazingly clever the way she's put it all together!

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  4. What a beautiful space. I had to scroll through twice to get a deeper appreciation for the subtleties. Add a few people and I'm sure the dynamics of the the place would change.
    Thanks for this eye opener this morning. Bernadette in Canada



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    Replies
    1. I love use of the word 'subtleties' - this is exactly what the design of this house is all about and what makes it so special. Happy you found this space inspiring too!

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  5. Where is that fabulous bathroom mirror from?!

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    Replies
    1. I wish I knew, but sadly I haven't see this particular model before. I hope someone else on here can help you!

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  6. That sofa is my dream. Not only it looks very deep and comfy, it is also fair bit off the ground so vacuuming underneath will be a breathe. Sadly, this is one of my important criteria when it comes to choosing a sofa (dog owners may understand).

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    Replies
    1. So true! I don't have a dog but have many friends that do (I've learnt that black socks don't mix with a white lab!). Love it when a design is beautiful and practical!

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  7. please, what is this plaster made of such effect

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