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An Eye-catching Plaster Wall In A Swedish Home

I remember the first time I saw a deliberately unfinished wall. I was at a friend's house when I was 16 and asked her if her parents were in the middle of decorating. She said "I know it looks like it, but it's actually meant to look like this," and we both had a bit of a giggle before running upstairs and listening to our yellow sports walkman or whatever!! Fast forward err (too many) years, and it's a look that I've not only become accustomed to, but love (when done right)! In this Gothenburg apartment a rough plaster wall in the hallway and sitting room adds so much texture to an otherwise neutral scheme - it helps that the space itself is absolutely beautiful too!















Photography courtesy of Alvhem

Isn't it such a lovely space? It's actually for sale too - got to love that!

What did you think of the hall and living room wall? Could you imagine doing something like this in your home? 

In case you're curious, I dug around a little today and found three different styles of  'textured' walls and simple ways to achieve the look.

1. Raw Plaster Wall

James Gardener and I captured the bedroom above in artist Maria Øverbye's relaxed Oslo home for my book The Scandinavian Home. Maria was planning to give the wall a fresh new lick of paint but fell in love with the patina created by the raw wall, dotted with fillers and decided to leave it exactly as it was!


Here is another beautiful example in Karina's Berlin home.  The 'distressed' look works because everything else has been kept fresh, while a vintage table helps to balance the look.



Laura and Nora love using the texture of a raw plaster wall in their country retreat to add depth to the pared-back space. It looks particularly great on a half-painted wall and with industrial-style furniture, don't you think?


2. Hand-troweled plaster work

This beautiful wall has been created by plaster work gurus Tara Mangini and Percy Bright of Jersery Ice Cream Co. The layer of pigmented plaster has been hand-troweled using gypsum (you can also use Lime, Vemeitan or Tadelakt) and the finished surface is smooth rather than textured. You can tap into your inner artist and create your own look - or make the most of Tara and Percy's new service and get these guys to do it for you!

3. Subtle concrete

In our dining room and window nook we added roll-a-tex sand texture to the paint (Fjäder by Jotun). The more you add, the more textured the look. It was actually a total faff to put it on the wall with a paint brush (wrong tool perhaps?!) - but it was worth it in the end!

You might remember the Norwegian bedroom of Steffen Olsen from a few weeks back (FYI it went on to win 'Norway's best bedroom'!). Steffen used Lady Minerals from Jotun to achieve this dramatic aesthetic on the wall.

If you have any tips, please do share them in the comment section below, I'm sure there are a million ways to create the industrial-style plaster / concrete wall!

Have a lovely day!

Niki



LATEST COMMENTS:

  1. Hi Niki,

    The post looks pretty awesome like the plaster-furnished whitish walls. Good depictions.

    ReplyDelete
  2. You can also achieve this look fairly easily by using 3 paints in a single tray (making sure you dip your roller consistently the same way so that the side with the darkest paint (for example) always gets the darkest paint. Each paint needs to have a bit of glaze added to it to extend the drying time. It is a little bit like the old sponge faux finish except in this case you use muslin or some other type of cheese cloth. You can achieve beautifully aged look - I did it in my previous house and it turned out above my expectations.

    ReplyDelete

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